FORM 10-K
Table of Contents

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549


FORM 10-K

 

x   ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2005

OR

¨   TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the transition period from              to             

 

Commission File Number 001-14962


CIRCOR INTERNATIONAL, INC.

(A Delaware Corporation)

 

I.R.S. Identification No. 04-3477276

 

c/o Circor, Inc.

Suite 130

25 Corporate Drive, Burlington, MA 01803-4238

Telephone: (781) 270-1200

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12 (b) of the Act:

Common Stock, par value $.01 per share (registered on the New York Stock Exchange)

Preferred Stock Purchase Rights

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12 (g) of the Act: None


 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. Yes  ¨    No  x

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Exchange Act. Yes  ¨    No  x

 

Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the Registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes  x    No  ¨

 

Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of Registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K.  x

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, or a non-accelerated filer. See definition of “accelerated filer” and “large accelerated filer” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

Large accelerated filer  ¨            Accelerated filer  x            Non-accelerated filer  ¨

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). Yes  ¨    No  x

 

The aggregate market value of voting stock held by non-affiliates of the Registrant as of June 30, 2005 was $384,758,747.

 

As of February 16, 2006, there were 15,855,514 shares of the Registrant’s Common Stock outstanding.

 

DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE

 

Part III incorporates by reference certain portions of the information from the Registrant’s definitive Proxy Statement for the 2006 Annual Meeting of Stockholders to be held on May 2, 2006. The definitive Proxy Statement will be filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission within 120 days of the end of 2005.

 



Table of Contents

Table of Contents

 

          Page

Part I
Item 1    Business    1
Item 1A    Risk Factors    12
Item 1B    Unresolved Staff Comments    19
Item 2    Properties    19
Item 3    Legal Proceedings    19
Item 4    Submission of Matters to a Vote of Security Holders    21
Part II
Item 5    Market for the Registrant’s Common Equity and Related Stockholder Matters    21
Item 6    Selected Financial Data    22
Item 7    Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations    23
Item 7A    Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk    41
Item 8    Financial Statements and Supplementary Data    42
Item 9    Changes In and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure    43
Item 9A&B    Controls and Procedures    43
Part III
Item 10    Directors and Executive Officers of the Registrant    44
Item 11    Executive Compensation    44
Item 12    Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters    44
Item 13    Certain Relationships and Related Transactions    45
Item 14    Principal Accountant Fees and Services    45
Part IV
Item 15    Exhibits and Financial Statement Schedules    45
     Signatures    50
     Reports of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm    51
     Consolidated Balance Sheets    54
     Consolidated Statements of Operations    55
     Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows    56
     Consolidated Statements of Shareholders’ Equity    57
     Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements    58
     Schedule II—Valuation and Qualifying Accounts    89


Table of Contents

Part I

 

Item 1.    Business

 

This annual report on Form 10-K (hereinafter, the “Annual Report”) contains certain statements that are “forward-looking statements” as that term is defined under the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 (the “Act”) and releases issued by the Securities and Exchange Commission. The words “may,” “hope,” “should,” “expect,” “plan,” “anticipate,” “intend,” “believe,” “estimate,” “predict,” “potential,” “continue,” and other expressions which are predictions of or indicate future events and trends and which do not relate to historical matters, identify forward-looking statements. We believe that it is important to communicate our future expectations to our stockholders, and we, therefore, make forward-looking statements in reliance upon the safe harbor provisions of the Act. However, there may be events in the future that we are not able to accurately predict or control, and our actual results may differ materially from the expectations we describe in our forward-looking statements. Forward-looking statements involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors, which may cause our actual results, performance or achievements to differ materially from anticipated future results, performance or achievements expressed or implied by such forward-looking statements. Factors that could cause or contribute to such differences include, but are not limited to, the cyclicality and highly competitive nature of some of our end markets which can affect the overall demand for and pricing of our products, changes in the price of and demand for oil and gas in both domestic and international markets, variability of raw material and component pricing, changes in our suppliers’ performance, fluctuations in foreign currency exchange rates, our ability to continue operating our manufacturing facilities at efficient levels including our ability to continue to reduce costs, our ability to generate increased cash by reducing our inventories, our prevention of the accumulation of excess inventory, our ability to successfully implement our acquisition strategy, increasing interest rates, our ability to continue to successfully defend product liability actions, as well as the uncertain continuing impact on economic and financial conditions in the United States and around the world as a result of terrorist attacks, current Middle Eastern tensions and related matters. We advise you to read further about certain of these and other risk factors set forth under the caption “Certain Risk Factors that May Affect Future Results” in this Annual Report. We undertake no obligation to publicly update or revise any forward-looking statement, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise.

 

Available Information

 

We file reports on Form 10-Q with the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) on a quarterly basis, additional reports on Form 8-K from time to time and a Definitive Proxy Statement and an annual report on Form 10-K on an annual basis. These and other reports filed by us, or furnished by us, to the SEC in accordance with section 13(a) or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, are available free of charge from the SEC on their website at http://www.sec.gov. Additionally, our Form 10-Q, Form 8-K and Form 10-K reports are available without charge, as soon as reasonably practicable after they have been filed with the SEC, from our website at www.circor.com by using the “Investor Relations” hyperlink. The information on our website is not part of or incorporated by reference in this Annual Report.

 

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Our History

 

We were established by our former parent, Watts Water Technologies, Inc., formerly known as Watts Industries, Inc. (“Watts”), to continue to operate the former industrial, oil and gas businesses of Watts. On October 18, 1999, Watts distributed all of our outstanding common stock to Watts shareholders of record as of October 6, 1999 in a tax-free distribution. As a result, information related to historical activities of our business units also includes time periods when such units constituted the former industrial, oil and gas businesses of Watts. As used in this report, the terms “we,” “us,” “our,” and “CIRCOR” mean CIRCOR International, Inc. and its subsidiaries (unless the context indicates another meaning). The term “common stock” means our common stock, par value $0.01 per share.

 

Our Business

 

We design, manufacture and distribute a broad array of valves and related fluid control products and services to a variety of end-markets for use in a wide range of applications to optimize the efficiency and/or ensure the safety of fluid-control systems. We have a global presence and operate 16 significant manufacturing facilities that are located in the United States, Canada, Western Europe and the People’s Republic of China. We have two major product groups: Instrumentation and Thermal Fluid Controls Products and Energy Products. As of December 31, 2005, our products were sold through more than 1,900 distributors and we serviced more than 12,000 customers in over 119 countries around the world. Within our major product groups, we have used both internal product development and strategic acquisitions to assemble an array of fluid-control products and technologies that enable us to address our customers’ unique fluid-control application needs.

 

Instrumentation and Thermal Fluid Controls Products Group—The Instrumentation and Thermal Fluid Controls Products Group designs, manufactures and distributes valves, fittings and controls for diverse end-uses, including instrumentation, aerospace, cryogenic and steam applications. Selected products include precision valves, compression tube fittings, control valves, relief valves, butterfly valves, solenoid valves, couplers, regulators, switches, strainers and samplers. The Instrumentation and Thermal Fluid Controls Products Group consists primarily of the following product brand names: Aerodyne Controls; Circle Seal Controls; Loud Engineering; Industria; Leslie Controls; Nicholson Steam Trap; GO Regulator; Hoke; Spence Engineering; Atkomatic Valve; CPC-Cryolab; RTK; SART von Rohr; Rockwood Swendeman; Spence Strainers; Dopak Sampling Systems, Texas Sampling, Tomco Quick Couplers and U.S. Para Plate.

 

The Instrumentation and Thermal Fluid Controls Products Group accounted for $251.2 million, or 56%, of our net revenues for the year ended December 31, 2005.

 

We have had a long-standing presence in the steam application markets, starting with our 1984 acquisition of Spence Engineering Company, Inc. (“Spence Engineering” or “Spence”) and our 1989 acquisitions of Leslie Controls, Inc. (“Leslie Controls”) and Nicholson Steam Trap, Inc. (“Nicholson Steam Trap”). In January 1999, we acquired SSI Equipment Inc. (“Spence Strainers”) and added a wide variety of strainers to expand our industrial products line. In June 2001, we acquired Regeltechnik Kornwestheim GmbH and affiliates (“RTK”) and Société Alsacienne Regulaves Thermiques von Rohr, S.A. (“SART”). We believe that we have a very strong franchise in steam valve products. Both Leslie Controls and Nicholson Steam Trap have been in the steam pressure reduction and control business for

 

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over 100 years. Spence Engineering has also been in these businesses for nearly 80 years. Due to the reputation of these businesses for reliability and quality, customers often specifically request our products by brand name. Our steam valve products are used in: municipal and institutional steam heating and air-conditioning applications; power plants; industrial and food processing; and commercial and military maritime applications.

 

In February 2006 we acquired Hale Hamilton Valves Limited (“Hale Hamilton”). Hale Hamilton is a leading provider of high pressure valves and flow control equipment to the naval defense, industrial gas and high technology industrial markets.

 

Commencing with the 1990 acquisition of Circle Seal Controls, Inc. (“Circle Seal”), a manufacturer of miniature instrumentation valves, we have acquired fourteen businesses that serve the instrumentation and aerospace fluid control markets. These acquisitions included Aerodyne Controls (“Aerodyne”) in December 1997, Atkomatic Valve (“Atkomatic”) in April 1998, Hoke, Inc. (“Hoke”) in July 1998, GO Regulator in April 1999, Tomco Products, Inc. (“Tomco”) and U.S. Para Plate Corporation (“U.S. Para Plate”) in October 2002, DQS International (“DQS”) in November 2003, Texas Sampling, Inc. (“TSI”) in December 2003, Loud Engineering & Manufacturing (“Loud”) in January 2005 and Industria S.A. (“Industria”) in October 2005. Aerodyne manufactures high-precision valve components for the medical, analytical, military and aerospace markets. Aerodyne also provides advanced technologies and control systems capabilities to other companies in the Instrumentation and Thermal Fluid Controls Products Group. The Atkomatic product line consists of heavy-duty process solenoid valves that automate the regulation and sequencing of liquid levels or volume flow. The GO Regulator products include a complete line of specialized cylinder valves, customized valves and pneumatic pressure regulators for instrumentation, analytical and process applications. The Tomco brand is a full line of quick connect and disconnect couplers for general-purpose industrial applications and more sophisticated instrumentation markets. The U.S. Para Plate products involve high-pressure valves and regulators for aerospace and military applications. DQS and TSI manufacture and sell analytical sampling products. Loud is a designer and manufacturer of landing gear systems and related components for military helicopters and jet aircraft, and Industria produces solenoid valves and components for commercial and military applications.

 

We significantly expanded the breadth of our instrumentation fluid control product lines with the acquisition of Hoke in July 1998. Our largest acquisition to date, Hoke provided us with a leading line of Gyrolok® compression tube fittings, as well as instrumentation ball valves, plug valves, manifolds, metering valves and needle valves. Circle Seal and Hoke serve several common markets and we cross-market their products through their respective distribution channels. Furthermore, Hoke, with nearly 54% of its 2005 revenues derived from outside of the United States, significantly expanded our geographic marketing and distribution capabilities. We have integrated administrative and distribution activities of Circle Seal and Hoke to further reduce costs. We believe that our ability to provide various instrumentation markets with complete fluid-control solutions is enhanced by the combined product line offerings of Circle Seal, Hoke, GO Regulator, Tomco, DQS, and TSI.

 

With the acquisition of the Cryolab product line in 1995, we entered the cryogenic sector of the valve market, further enhancing our position in the instrumentation and thermal fluid controls valve business. Since then we have added Consolidated Precision Corporation (“CPC”) in 1996 and the Rockwood

 

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Swendeman product line in 2000 which collectively gave us a broader array of valve products for demanding cryogenic applications and enabled us to expand our presence in the industrial gas markets.

 

Energy Products Group—During 2004, we renamed our Petrochemical Products Group to the Energy Products Group. The Energy Products Group designs, manufactures and distributes flanged-end and threaded-end floating and trunnion ball valves, needle valves, check valves, butterfly valves, large forged steel ball valves, gate valves, control valves, relief valves, pressure regulators and pipeline closures for use in oil, gas and chemical processing and industrial applications. We believe that our Energy Products Group is one of the leading producers of ball valves for the oil and natural gas markets worldwide. The Energy Products Group consists primarily of the following product brand names: KF Industries; KF Contromatics; Pibiviesse; Circor Energy Products Canada; Mallard Control, Hydroseal, and SKVC.

 

The Energy Products Group accounted for $199.3 million, or 44%, of our net revenues for the year ended December 31, 2005.

 

We entered the energy products market in 1978 with the formation by Watts of the industrial products division and our development of a floating ball valve for industrial and chemical processing applications. With the acquisition of KF Industries, Inc. (“KF Industries”) in July 1988, we expanded our product offerings to include floating and trunnion-supported ball valves and needle valves. KF Industries gave us entry into the oil and gas transmission, distribution and exploration markets. In 1989, we acquired Eagle Check Valve, which added check valves to our product line. Pibiviesse S.p.A. (“Pibiviesse”), based in Nerviano, Italy, was acquired in November 1994. Pibiviesse manufactures forged steel ball valves for the petrochemical market, including a complete range of trunnion-mounted ball valves. Pibiviesse’s manufacturing capabilities include valve sizes up through 60 inches in diameter, including very high pressure ratings to meet demanding international oil and gas pipeline and production requirements. In March 1998, we acquired and added Telford Valve and Specialties, Inc. (now referred to as “Circor Energy Products Canada”) to KF Industries. Circor Energy Products Canada had been one of KF Industries’ largest distributors and, with its acquisition, KF Industries increased its presence in Canada, as well as introduced Circor Energy Products Canada’s products (check valves, pipeline closures, and specialty gate valves) through its worldwide representative network. Circor Energy Products Canada also has assumed the Canadian sales activities for other of our Energy Products Group companies to strengthen our overall sales presence in Canada. During 1999, we consolidated the industrial products division of Watts under the KF Contromatics name into KF Industries in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. These industrial products consist of carbon steel and stainless steel ball valves, butterfly valves and pneumatic actuators that are used in a variety of industrial, pulp, paper and chemical processing applications. In April 2004, we acquired Mallard Control Company and its wholly-owned subsidiary, Hydroseal, (“Mallard”) which produces control valves, relief valves, pressure regulators, and other related products primarily for oil and gas production and processing and other petrochemical applications. During 2005, we merged the operations of Mallard and Hydroseal into KF Industries’ Oklahoma City facility and renamed the resulting entity Circor Energy Products Inc. (“CEP”). As a result, CEP now manufacturers and sells product under the KF industries, Mallard Control, Hydroseal Valve and Contromatics names.

 

In May 2005, we acquired the 40% interest that we did not own in our Chinese joint venture, Suzhou KF Valve Company, Ltd. (“SKVC”), located in Suzhou, People’s Republic of China. SKVC manufactures two-inch

 

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through twenty-four-inch carbon and stainless steel ball valves. We sell products manufactured by SKVC to customers worldwide for oil and gas applications. In February 2006, we acquired Sagebrush Pipeline Equipment Company (“Sagebrush”) which provides pipeline flow control and measurement equipment to the North American oil and gas markets.

 

Industry

 

Oil and Gas and Petrochemical Markets. The oil and gas and petrochemical markets include domestic and international oil and gas exploration and production, distribution, refining, pipeline construction and maintenance, chemical processing and general industrial applications.

 

Process and Power Markets. The process and power markets use valves to control steam and other fluids for a variety of applications, including: heating facilities; production of hot water and electricity; freeze protection of external piping; cleaning by laundries; food processing and cooking; and heat transfer applications using steam or hot water in industrial processes.

 

HVAC and Maritime Markets. The HVAC market utilizes valves and control systems, primarily in steam-related commercial and institutional heating applications. Steam control products also are used in the maritime market, which includes the U.S. Navy and commercial shipping.

 

Aerospace Markets. The commercial and military aerospace markets we serve include valve and component applications used on military combat and transport aircraft, helicopters, missiles, tracked vehicles and ships. Our products also are used on commercial, commuter and business aircraft, space launch vehicles, space shuttles and satellites. Our products also are sold into the support infrastructure for these markets, with such applications as ground support maintenance equipment. We supply products used in hydraulic, fuel, water, and air systems.

 

Pharmaceutical, Medical and Analytical Instrumentation Markets. The pharmaceutical industry uses our products in research and development, analytical instrumentation and process measurement applications. We also market our products to original equipment manufacturers of surgical and medical instruments. Representative applications include: surgical and medical instruments; orthopedic devices and surgical supplies; diagnostic reagents; electro-medical equipment; x-ray equipment; and dental equipment.

 

Our Business Objectives and Strategies

 

We are focused on providing solutions for our customers’ fluid-control requirements through a broad base of products and services. We believe many of our product lines have leading positions in their niche markets. Our objective is to enhance shareholder value through profitable growth of our diversified, multi-national, fluid-control company. In order to achieve this objective, our key strategies are to:

 

    Continue to build market positions;

 

    Improve the profitability of our business;

 

    Expand into various fluid control industries and markets and capitalize on integration opportunities;

 

    Increase product offerings; and

 

    Expand our geographic coverage.

 

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Overall, our growth strategies are expected to continue increasing our market positions, building our product offerings, enhancing marketing and distribution channels and providing additional opportunities to realize integration cost savings.

 

Products

 

The following table lists the principal products and markets served by each of the businesses within our two product groups. Within the majority of our product lines, we believe that we have competitively broad product offerings in terms of distinct designs, sizes and configurations of our valves and related products.

 

Product Families


   Principal Products

  

Primary Markets Served


Instrumentation and Thermal Fluid Controls Products Group

    

Aerodyne Controls

   Pneumatic manifold switches; mercury-
free motion switches; pneumatic
valves; control assemblies
   Aerospace; medical instrumentation; military; automotive

Circle Seal Controls

   Motor-operated valves; check valves;
relief valves; pneumatic valves; gauges;
solenoid valves; regulators
   General industrial; power generation; medical; pharmaceutical; aerospace; military; natural gas vehicles

CPC-Cryolab and Rockwood Swendeman

   Cryogenic control and safety relief
valves; valve assemblies
   Liquefied industrial gases; other high purity processing

Dopak Sampling Systems

   Sampling systems for liquids, liquefied
gas, and gases
   Chemical; petrochemical; pharmaceutical; biotech; and food and beverage industries

GO Regulator

   Pressure reducing regulators;
specialized cylinder manifolds; high
pressure regulators; pneumatic
pressure regulators; diaphragm valves
   Analytical instrumentation; chemical processing; semiconductors

Hale Hamilton

   Stop valves; relief valves; pressure
regulators; reducing stations; filling
systems
   Maritime and naval defense; industrial gas; high technology industrial

Hoke

   Compression tube fittings; instrument
ball and needle valves; cylinders;
cylinder valves; actuators; modular
analyzer systems
   General industrial; analytical instrumentation; compressed natural gas; natural gas vehicles; chemical processing; semiconductors

Industria

   Solenoid valves and components    Aerospace; commercial and military

Leslie Controls

   Steam and water regulators; steam
control valves; electric actuated shut-
off valves; steam water heaters
   HVAC; maritime; general industrial and power; chemical processing

Loud Engineering

   Landing gear systems; struts;
solenoids; actuators
   Aerospace; military

 

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Product Families


  

Principal Products


  

Primary Markets Served


Instrumentation and Thermal Fluid Controls Products Group – (Continued)

Nicholson Steam Trap

   Steam traps; condensate pumps; unions    HVAC; general industrial; industrial processing

RTK and SART

   Control valves; regulators; actuators; and related instrumentation products    HVAC; industrial; food and beverage; pharmaceutical

Spence Engineering

   Safety and relief valves; pilot operated and direct steam regulators; steam control valves    HVAC; general industrial

Spence Strainers

   Specialty strainers; check valves; butterfly valves; connectors    General industrial; chemical processing; refining; power; and HVAC

Texas Sampling

   Closed loop sampling systems    Refining and pharmaceutical

Tomco

   Pneumatic and hydraulic quick couplers and safety relief valves    General industrial and instrumentation

U.S. Para Plate

   High pressure valves and regulators    Aerospace; military; industrial wash systems

Energy Products Group

         

KF Contromatics

   Threaded-end and flanged-end floating ball valves; butterfly valves; pneumatic and electric actuators    Oil and gas; refining; general industrial; chemical processing

KF Industries

   Threaded-end and flanged-end floating ball valves; actuators; pipeline closures; trunnion supported ball valves; needle valves; check valves    Oil and gas exploration; production; refining and transmission; maritime; chemical processing

Circor Energy Products Canada

   Mud valves; pipeline closures; check valves and specialty gate valves    Oil and gas exploration; production; refining and transmission

Mallard Control

   Control valves; relief valves; pressure regulators; and other related products    Oil and gas production and processing and other industrial applications

Pibiviesse

   Forged steel ball valves    Oil and gas exploration; production; refining and transmission

Sagebrush

   Pipeline flow control and measurement systems    Oil and gas production; refining and transmission

SKVC

   Flanged and floating ball valves    Oil and gas exploration; production; refining and transmission; chemical processing

 

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Sales and Distribution

 

We sell our products to distributors and end-users primarily through commissioned representatives and through our direct sales forces. Our representative networks offer technically trained sales forces with strong relationships to key markets on a variable cost (commission) basis to us.

 

We believe that our multifaceted and well established sales and distribution channels constitute a competitive strength, providing access to our markets. We believe that we have good relationships with our representatives and distributors and we continue to implement marketing programs to enhance these relationships. Ongoing distribution-enhancement programs include shortening shelf stock delivery, reducing assemble-to-order lead times, introducing new products, and offering competitive pricing, technical training and literature.

 

Manufacturing

 

We have fully-integrated and highly automated manufacturing capabilities including machining operations, assembly and testing. We also purchase machined components and finished valves to supplement our internal manufacturing capacity and to lower our overall cost of less sophisticated valve products. Our machining operations feature computer-controlled machine tools, high-speed chucking machines and automatic screw machines for machining brass, iron, steel and aluminum components. We believe that our fully-integrated manufacturing capabilities of critical components are essential in the valve industry in order to control product quality, to be responsive to customers’ custom design requirements and to ensure timely delivery. Product quality and performance are a priority for our customers, especially since many of our product applications involve caustic or volatile chemicals and, in many cases, involve processes that are used in the precise control of fluids. In order to further improve our profitability and increase working capital turns, we consolidated additional facilities in 2005 and started implementation of lean manufacturing techniques, beginning with training employees at our larger U.S. plants and conducting associated Kaizan events in our internal manufacturing processes. We also continued to further expand our foreign sourcing programs.

 

We are committed to maintaining our manufacturing equipment at a level consistent with current technology in order to maintain high levels of quality and manufacturing efficiencies. As part of this commitment, we have spent a total of $15.0 million, $5.3 million, and $6.8 million on capital expenditures for the years ended December 31, 2005, 2004, and 2003, respectively. Capital expenditures for 2005 include $7.4 million related to the purchase of new facilities in China and the Netherlands. Depreciation expense for these periods was $9.8 million, $9.7 million, and $9.6 million, respectively.

 

We believe that our current facilities will meet our near-term production requirements without the need for additional facilities.

 

Quality Control

 

The majority of our products require the approval of and have been approved by applicable industry standards agencies in the United States and European markets. We have consistently advocated the development and enforcement of performance and safety standards, and continually update our procedures as part of our commitment to meet these standards. We maintain quality control and testing procedures at each of our manufacturing facilities in order to produce products in compliance with these

 

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standards. Additionally, most of our major manufacturing subsidiaries have acquired ISO 9000 or 9001 certification from the International Organization for Standardization and, for those in the Energy Products Group, American Petroleum Institute certification.

 

Our products are designed, manufactured and tested to meet the requirements of various government or industry regulatory bodies as well as the quality control systems of certain customers. The primary industry standards that certain of our Instrumentation and Thermal Fluid Controls Products must meet include standards promulgated by: Underwriters’ Laboratory; American National Standards Institute; American Society of Mechanical Engineers; U.S. Military; Federal Aviation Administration; Society of Automotive Engineers; Boeing Basic and Advanced Management System; Aerospace Quality Assurance System; the American Gas Association; the Department of Transportation; and European Pressure Equipment Directive and Technical Inspection Association. The primary industry standards required to be met by and applicable to our Energy Products include: American National Standards Institute; American Society of Mechanical Engineers; American Petroleum Institute and Factory Mutual.

 

Product Development

 

We continue to develop new and innovative products to enhance our market positions. Our product development capabilities include the ability to design and manufacture custom applications to meet high tolerance or close precision requirements. For example, KF Industries has fire-safe testing capabilities, Circle Seal has the ability to meet the testing specifications of the aerospace industry and Pibiviesse can meet the tolerance requirements of sub-sea and cryogenic environments. These testing and manufacturing capabilities have enabled us to develop customer-specified applications, unique characteristics of which have been subsequently utilized in broader product offerings. Our research and development expenditures for the years ended December 31, 2005, 2004, and 2003, were $1.9 million, $1.6 million, and $2.4 million, respectively. As a result of relocating certain research and development functions to locations with lower operating costs during 2003 and 2004 as well as open staff positions during 2004, net research and development costs in 2004 and 2005 were less than our historical levels.

 

Raw Materials

 

The raw materials used most often in our production processes are stainless steel, carbon steel, aluminum, bronze, and brass. These materials are subject to price fluctuations that may adversely affect our results of operations. We purchase these materials from numerous suppliers and have recently experienced constraints on the supply of certain raw material as well as the inability of certain suppliers to respond to our increasing needs. Historically, increases in the prices of raw materials have been partially offset by increased sales prices, active materials management, project engineering programs and the diversity of materials used in our production processes.

 

Competition

 

The domestic and international markets for our products are highly competitive. Some of our competitors have substantially greater financial, marketing, personnel and other resources than us. We consider product quality, performance, price, distribution capabilities and breadth of product offerings to be the primary competitive factors in these markets. We believe that new product development and

 

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product engineering are also important to our success and that our position in the industry is attributable, in significant part, to our ability to develop innovative products quickly, and to adapt and enhance existing products to specific customer applications.

 

The primary competitors of our Instrumentation and Thermal Fluid Controls Products Group include: Swagelok Company; Parker Hannifin Corporation; Samson AG; Spirax-Sarco Engineering plc; Masonneilan (a division of Dresser, Inc.); Flowseal (a division of Crane Co.); Fisher (a division of Emerson Electric Company); ASCO; and Tescom (a division of Emerson Electric Company).

 

The primary competitors of our Energy Products Group include: Cooper Cameron Corporation; Apollo (a unit of Conbraco Industries, Inc.); Jamesbury, Inc. (a unit of Metso USA which is part of the Metso Corporation); Balon; Worcester Controls Corp. (a unit of Flowserve); Crane Co.; Velan Valve Corporation; and Kitz Corporation.

 

Trademarks and Patents

 

We own patents that are scheduled to expire between 2006 and 2024 and trademarks that can be renewed as long as we continue to use them. We do not believe the vitality and competitiveness of either of our business segments as a whole depends on any one or more patents or trademarks. We own certain licenses such as software licenses, but we also do not believe that our business as a whole depends on any one or more licenses.

 

Customers, Cyclicality and Seasonality

 

For the year ended December 31, 2005, no single customer accounted for more than 10% of revenues for either the Instrumentation and Thermal Fluid Controls Products Group or the Energy Products Group.

 

We have experienced and expect to continue to experience fluctuations in revenues and operating results due to economic and business cycles. Our businesses, particularly the Energy Products Group, are cyclical in nature as the worldwide demand for oil and gas fluctuates. When the worldwide demand for oil and gas is depressed, the demand for our products used in those markets declines. Future changes in demand for petrochemical products could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition or results of operations. Similarly, although not to the same extent as the oil and gas markets, the aerospace, military and maritime markets have historically experienced cyclical fluctuations in demand that could also have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition or results of operations.

 

Backlog

 

Our total order backlog was $190.9 million as of February 10, 2006, compared to $144.8 million as of February 18, 2005. We expect all but $18.1 million of the backlog at February 10, 2006 will be shipped by December 31, 2006. The change in our backlog was primarily due to increased orders for major international oil and gas projects and the acquisitions of Industria in October 2005 and Sagebrush and Hale Hamilton in February 2006.

 

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Employees

 

As of December 31, 2005, our worldwide operations directly employed approximately 2,300 people. We have 73 employees in the United States who are covered by a single collective bargaining agreement. We also have 155 employees in Italy, 169 employees in France, 41 in the Netherlands, and 109 employees in Germany covered by governmental regulations or workers’ councils. We believe that our employee relations are good at this time. Our February 2006 acquisitions of Hale Hamilton and Sagebrush included approximately 200 and 112 employees, respectively. A majority of the Hale Hamilton employees are located in England and all of the Sagebrush employees are located in the United States, none of whom are subject to collective bargaining agreements.

 

Segment and Geographic Financial Data

 

Financial information by segment and geographic area is incorporated herein by reference to Part II, Item 7, “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” and Note 17 in the notes to consolidated financial statements included in this report.

 

Government Regulation Regarding the Environment

 

As a result of our manufacturing and assembly operations, our businesses are subject to federal, state, local and foreign laws, as well as other legal requirements relating to the generation, storage, transport and disposal of materials. These laws include, without limitation, the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, the Clean Air Act, the Clean Water Act and the Comprehensive Environmental Response and Compensation and Liability Act.

 

We currently do not anticipate any materially adverse impact on our business, financial condition or results of operations as a result of our compliance with federal, state, local and foreign environmental laws. However, risk of environmental liability and charges associated with maintaining compliance with environmental laws is inherent in the nature of our manufacturing operations and there is no assurance that material liabilities or charges could not arise. During the year ended December 31, 2005, we capitalized approximately $0.2 million related to environmental and safety control facilities and we also incurred and expensed an additional $0.4 million related to environmental and safety control facilities. We also expect to capitalize $0.5 million related to environmental and safety control facilities during the year ending December 31, 2006 and also expect to incur and expense charges of approximately $0.5 million related to environmental during the year ending December 31, 2006.

 

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Item 1A.    Risk Factors

 

Certain Risk Factors That May Affect Future Results

 

Set forth below are certain risk factors that we believe are material to our stockholders. If any of the following risks occur, our business, financial condition, results of operations, and reputation could be harmed. You should also consider these risk factors when you read “forward-looking statements” elsewhere in this report. You can identify forward-looking statements by terms such as “may,” “hope,” “should,” “expect,” “plan,” “anticipate,” “intend,” “believe,” “estimate,” “predict,” “potential,” or “continue,” the negative of those terms or other comparable terminology. Those forward-looking statements are only predictions and can be adversely affected if any of the following risks occur:

 

Some of our end-markets are cyclical, which may cause us to experience fluctuations in revenues or operating results.

 

We have experienced, and expect to continue to experience, fluctuations in revenues and operating results due to economic and business cycles. We sell our products principally to oil, gas, petrochemical, process, power, aerospace, military, heating, ventilation and air conditioning (“HVAC”), maritime, pharmaceutical, and medical and instrumentation markets. Although we serve a variety of markets to avoid a dependency on any one, a significant downturn in any one of these markets could cause a material reduction in our revenues that could be difficult to offset.

 

In particular, our petrochemical business is cyclical in nature as the worldwide demand for oil and gas fluctuates. When worldwide demand for oil and gas is depressed, the demand for our products used in maintenance and repair of existing oil and gas applications, as well as exploration or new oil and gas project applications, is reduced. As a result, we historically have generated lower revenues and profits in periods of declining demand for petrochemical products. Therefore, results of operations for any particular period are not necessarily indicative of the results of operations for any future period. Future downturns in demand for petrochemical products could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition or results of operations. Similarly, although not to the same extent as the oil and gas markets, the aerospace, military and maritime markets have historically experienced cyclical fluctuations in demand that also could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition or results of operations.

 

We face the continuing impact on economic and financial conditions in the United States and around the world as well as current tensions in Iraq and the rest of the Middle East.

 

Terrorist attacks have negatively impacted general economic, market and political conditions. In particular, terrorist attacks, compounded with changes in the national economy, resulted in reduced revenues in the aerospace and general industrial markets in years 2002 and 2003. Although economic conditions appear to be improving, additional terrorist acts or acts of war (wherever located around the world) could cause damage or disruption to our business, our facilities or our employees which could significantly impact our business, financial condition or results of operations. The potential for future terrorist attacks, the national and international responses to terrorist attacks, and other acts of war or hostility, including the current tensions in Iraq and the Middle East, have created many economic and political uncertainties, which could adversely affect our business and results of operations in ways that cannot presently be predicted. In addition, with manufacturing facilities located worldwide, including facilities located in the United States, Canada, Western Europe and the People’s Republic of China, we may be impacted by terrorist actions not only against the United States but in other parts of the world as well. We are not insured for losses and interruptions caused by terrorist acts and acts of war for our aviation products.

 

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If we cannot continue operating our manufacturing facilities at current or higher levels, our results of operations could be adversely affected.

 

We operate a number of manufacturing facilities for the production of our products. The equipment and management systems necessary for such operations may break down, perform poorly, or fail, resulting in fluctuations in manufacturing efficiencies. Such fluctuations may affect our ability to deliver products to our customers on a timely basis, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition or results of operations. Commencing in 2005, we embarked on a company wide program to implement lean manufacturing techniques. We believe that this process will produce meaningful reductions in manufacturing costs. However, implementation of these techniques may cause short-term inefficiencies in production. If we ultimately are unable to successfully implement these processes our anticipated profitability may suffer.

 

We face significant competition in our markets and, if we are not able to respond to competition in our markets, our revenues may decrease.

 

We face significant competition from a variety of competitors in each of our markets. Some of our competitors have substantially greater financial, marketing, personnel and other resources than we do. New competitors also could enter our markets. We consider product quality, performance, price, distribution capabilities and breadth of product offerings to be the primary competitive factors in our markets. Our competitors may be able to offer more attractive pricing, duplicate our strategies, or develop enhancements to products that could offer performance features that are superior to our products. Competitive pressures, including those described above, and other factors could adversely affect our competitive position, involving a loss of market share or decreases in prices, either of which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition or results of operations. In addition, some of our competitors are based in foreign countries and have cost structures and prices based on foreign currencies. Accordingly, currency fluctuations could cause our U.S. dollar-priced products to be less competitive than our competitors’ products that are priced in other currencies.

 

If we experience delays in introducing new products or if our existing or new products do not achieve or maintain market acceptance, our revenues may decrease.

 

Our industries are characterized by: intense competition; changes in end-user requirements; technically complex products; and evolving product offerings and introductions.

 

We believe our future success will depend, in part, on our ability to anticipate or adapt to these factors and to offer, on a timely basis, products that meet customer demands. Failure to develop new and innovative products or to custom design existing products could result in the loss of existing customers to competitors or the inability to attract new business, either of which may adversely affect our revenues. The development of new or enhanced products is a complex and uncertain process requiring the anticipation of technological and market trends. We may experience design, manufacturing, marketing or other difficulties, such as an inability to attract a sufficient number of qualified engineers, which could delay or prevent our development, introduction or marketing of new products or enhancements and result in unexpected expenses.

 

Implementation of our acquisition strategy may not be successful, which could affect our ability to increase our revenues or could reduce our profitability.

 

One of our continued strategies is to increase our revenues and expand our markets through acquisitions that will provide us with complementary instrumentation and thermal fluid controls and energy

 

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products. We expect to spend significant time and effort in expanding our existing businesses and identifying, completing and integrating acquisitions. We expect to face competition for acquisition candidates that may limit the number of acquisition opportunities available to us and may result in higher acquisition prices. We cannot be certain that we will be able to identify, acquire or profitably manage additional companies or successfully integrate such additional companies without substantial costs, delays or other problems. Also, there can be no assurance that companies we acquire in the future will achieve revenues, profitability or cash flows that justify our investment in them. In addition, acquisitions may involve a number of special risks, including: adverse short-term effects on our reported operating results; diversion of management’s attention; loss of key personnel at acquired companies; or unanticipated management or operational problems or legal liabilities. Some or all of these special risks could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition or results of operations.

 

If we fail to manufacture and deliver high quality products, we may lose customers.

 

Product quality and performance are a priority for our customers since many of our product applications involve caustic or volatile chemicals and, in many cases, involve processes that require precise control of fluids. Our products also are used in the aerospace, military, commercial aircraft, pharmaceutical, medical, analytical equipment, oil and gas exploration, transmission and refining, chemical processing, and maritime industries. These industries require products that meet stringent performance and safety standards. If we fail to maintain and enforce quality control and testing procedures, our products will not meet these stringent performance and safety standards. Substandard products would seriously harm our reputation, resulting in both a loss of current customers to our competitors and damage to our ability to attract new customers, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition or results of operations.

 

If we are unable to continue operating successfully overseas or to successfully expand into new international markets, our revenues may decrease.

 

We derive a significant portion of our revenue from sales outside the United States. In addition, one of our key growth strategies is to market our products in international markets not currently served by us in portions of Europe, Latin America and Asia. We may not succeed in marketing, selling and distributing our products in these new markets. Moreover, conducting business outside the United States is subject to additional risks, including currency exchange rate fluctuations, changes in regional, political or economic conditions, trade protection measures such as tariffs or import or export restrictions, and unexpected changes in regulatory requirements. One or more of these factors could prevent us from successfully expanding into new international markets and could also have a material adverse effect on our current international operations.

 

If we can not pass on higher raw material or manufacturing costs to our customers, we may become less profitable.

 

One of the ways we attempt to manage the risk of higher raw material and manufacturing costs is to increase selling prices to our customers. The markets we serve are extremely competitive and customers may not accept price increases or may look to alternative suppliers which may negatively impact our profitability and revenues.

 

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If our suppliers can not provide us with adequate quantities of materials to meet our customers demands on a timely basis or if the quality of the materials provided does not meet our standards we may lose customers or experience lower profitability.

 

Some of our customer contracts require us to compensate them if we do not meet specified delivery obligations. We rely on numerous suppliers to provide us with our required materials and in many instances these materials must meet certain specifications. During 2004 and 2005 we experienced diminished supplier performance that negatively impacted our operating and net income. The diminished supplier performance was the result of: the closure suppliers, problems with new supplier on-time delivery reliability as well as lower than expected new supplier qualification acceptance. We are in the process of remediating or have taken steps to remediate these lower supplier performance issues and believe the diminished impact on profitability may be alleviated. A continuation of these factors could have a negative impact on our ability to deliver our products to our customers within our committed time frames and could result in continued reductions of our operating and net income in future periods.

 

A change in international governmental policies or restrictions could result in decreased availability and increased costs for certain components and finished products that we outsource, which could adversely affect our profitability.

 

Like most manufacturers of fluid control products, we attempt, where appropriate, to reduce costs by seeking lower cost sources of certain components and finished products. Many such sources are located in developing countries such as the People’s Republic of China, India and Taiwan, where a change in governmental approach toward U.S. trade could restrict the availability to us of such sources. In addition, periods of war or other international tension could interfere with international freight operations and hinder our ability to take delivery of such components and products. A decrease in the availability of these items could hinder our ability to timely meet our customers’ orders. We attempt, when possible, to mitigate this risk by maintaining alternate sources for these components and products and by maintaining the capability to produce such items in our own manufacturing facilities. However, even when we are able to mitigate this risk, the cost of obtaining such items from alternate sources or producing them ourselves is often considerably greater, and a shift toward such higher cost production could therefore adversely affect our profitability.

 

The costs of complying with existing or future environmental regulations, and curing any violations of these regulations could increase our expenses or reduce our profitability.

 

We are subject to a variety of environmental laws relating to the storage, discharge, handling, emission, generation, use and disposal of chemicals, solid and hazardous waste and other toxic and hazardous materials used to manufacture, or resulting from the process of manufacturing, our products. We cannot predict the nature, scope or effect of future regulatory requirements to which our operations might be subject or the manner in which existing or future laws will be administered or interpreted. Future regulations could be applied to materials, products or activities that have not been subject to regulation previously. The costs of complying with new or more stringent regulations, or with more vigorous enforcement of these or existing regulations could be significant.

 

Environmental laws require us to maintain and comply with a number of permits, authorizations and approvals and to maintain and update training programs and safety data regarding materials used in our

 

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processes. Violations of these requirements could result in financial penalties and other enforcement actions. We also could be required to halt one or more portions of our operations until a violation is cured. Although we attempt to operate in compliance with these environmental laws, we may not succeed in this effort at all times. The costs of curing violations or resolving enforcement actions that might be initiated by government authorities could be substantial.

 

The costs of complying with existing or future governmental regulations on importing and exporting practices and of curing any violations of these regulations, could increase our expenses, reduce our revenues or reduce our profitability.

 

We are subject to a variety of laws and international trade practices including regulations issued by the United States Bureau of Customs and Border Protection, the Bureau of Export Administration, the Department of State, the Department of Treasury. We cannot predict the nature, scope or effect of future regulatory requirements to which our international trading practices might be subject or the manner in which existing laws might be administered or interpreted. Future regulations could limit the countries into which certain of our products may be sold or could restrict our access to and increase the cost of obtaining products from foreign sources. In addition, actual or alleged violations of such regulations could result in enforcement actions and/or financial penalties that could result in substantial costs.

 

If our internal controls over financial reporting do not comply with the requirements of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, our business and stock price could be adversely affected.

 

If either Management or our independent registered public accounting firm identifies one or more material weaknesses in internal control over financial reporting that exist as of the end of our fiscal year, the material weakness(es) will be reported either by management in its self assessment or by our independent registered public accounting firm in their report or both, which may result in a loss of public confidence and could have an adverse affect on our business and our stock price. This could also result in significant additional expenditures responding to the Section 404 internal control audit and a diversion of management attention.

 

We face risks from product liability lawsuits that may adversely affect our business.

 

We, like other manufacturers and distributors of products designed to control and regulate fluids and chemicals, face an inherent risk of exposure to product liability claims in the event that the use of our products results in personal injury, property damage or business interruption to our customers. We may be subjected to various product liability claims, including, among others, that our products include inadequate or improper instructions for use or installation, or inadequate warnings concerning the effects of the failure of our products. Although we maintain strict quality controls and procedures, including the testing of raw materials and safety testing of selected finished products, we cannot be certain that our products will be completely free from defect. In addition, in certain cases, we rely on third-party manufacturers for our products or components of our products. Although we have liability insurance coverage, we cannot be certain that this insurance coverage will continue to be available to us at a reasonable cost, or, if available, will be adequate to cover any such liabilities. We generally seek to obtain contractual indemnification from our third-party suppliers, and for us to be added as an additional insured party under such parties’ insurance policies. Any such indemnification or insurance is

 

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limited by its terms and, as a practical matter, is limited to the credit worthiness of the indemnifying or insuring party. In the event that we do not have adequate insurance or contractual indemnification, product liabilities could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition or results of operations.

 

The costs associated with the defense of asbestos-related claims and the payment of any judgments or settlements with respect to such claims are subject to a number of uncertainties. As such, we cannot guarantee that such claims ultimately will not have an adverse effect on our financial statements, results of operations or cash flows.

 

Like many other manufacturers of fluid control products, we have been named as defendants in a growing number of product liability actions brought on behalf of individuals who seek compensation for their alleged exposure to airborne asbestos fibers. In general, any components containing asbestos formerly used in our products were entirely internal to the product and, we believe, would not give rise to ambient asbestos dust during normal operation or during normal inspection and maintenance. As such, we have no basis on which to conclude that these cases will have a material adverse effect on our financial condition, results of operations or cash flow. However, due to the nature and number of variables associated with asbestos related claims, such as the rate at which new claims may be filed; the availability of insurance policies to continue to recover certain of our costs relating to the defense and payment of these claims; the impact of bankruptcies of other companies currently or historically defending asbestos claims; the uncertainties surrounding the litigation process from jurisdiction to jurisdiction and from case to case; the impact of potential changes in legislative or judicial standards; the type and severity of the disease alleged to be suffered by each claimant; and increases in the expense of medical treatment, we are unable to reliably estimate the ultimate costs of these claims.

 

We depend on our key personnel and the loss of their services may adversely affect our business.

 

We believe that our success will depend on the continued employment of our senior management team and other key personnel. If one or more members of our senior management team or other key personnel were unable or unwilling to continue in their present positions, our business could be seriously harmed. In addition, if any of our key personnel joins a competitor or forms a competing company, some of our customers might choose to use the services of that competitor or those of a new company instead of our own. Other companies seeking to develop capabilities and products similar to ours may hire away some of our key personnel. Nonetheless, if we are unable to maintain our key personnel and attract new employees, the execution of our business strategy may be hindered and our growth limited.

 

Various restrictions and agreements could hinder a takeover of us which is not supported by our board of directors or which is leveraged.

 

Our amended and restated certificate of incorporation and amended and restated by-laws, the Delaware General Corporation Law and our shareholder rights plan contain provisions that could delay or prevent a change in control in a transaction that is not approved by our board of directors or that is on a leveraged basis or otherwise. These include provisions creating a staggered board, limiting the shareholders’ powers to remove directors, and prohibiting shareholders from calling a special meeting or

 

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taking action by written consent in lieu of a shareholders’ meeting. In addition, our board of directors has the authority, without further action by the shareholders, to set the terms of and to issue preferred stock. Issuing preferred stock could adversely affect the voting power of the owners of our common stock, including the loss of voting control to others. Additionally, we have adopted a shareholder rights plan providing for the issuance of rights that will cause substantial dilution to a person or group of persons that acquires 15% or more of our shares of common stock, unless the rights are redeemed.

 

Delaying or preventing a takeover could result in our shareholders ultimately receiving less for their shares by deterring potential bidders for our stock or assets.

 

Our debt agreements limit our ability to issue equity, make acquisitions, incur debt, pay dividends, make investments, sell assets, merge or raise capital.

 

Our senior note purchase agreement, dated October 19, 1999, outstanding industrial revenue bonds, and our revolving credit facility agreement, dated December 20, 2005, govern our indebtedness to our lenders. The debt agreements include provisions which place limitations on certain activities including our ability to: issue shares of our common stock; incur additional indebtedness; create any liens or encumbrances on our assets or make any guarantees; make certain investments; pay cash dividends above certain limits; or dispose of or sell assets or enter into a merger or a similar transaction.

 

The trading price of our common stock may be volatile and investors in our common stock may experience substantial losses.

 

The trading price of our common stock may be volatile. Our common stock could decline or fluctuate in response to a variety of factors, including, but not limited to: our failure to meet the performance estimates of securities analysts; changes in financial estimates of our revenues and operating results or buy/sell recommendations by securities analysts; the timing of announcements by us or our competitors concerning significant product line developments, contracts or acquisitions or publicity regarding actual or potential results or performance; fluctuation in our quarterly operating results caused by fluctuations in revenue and expenses; substantial sales of our common stock by our existing shareholders; general stock market conditions; or other economic or external factors.

 

In addition, the stock market as a whole has in the past experienced price and volume fluctuations. In the past, securities class action litigation has often been instituted against companies following periods of volatility in the market price of their securities. This type of litigation could result in substantial costs and a diversion of management attention and resources.

 

Our international activities expose us to fluctuations in currency exchange rates that could adversely affect our results of operations and cash flows.

 

Our international manufacturing and sales activities expose us to changes in foreign currency exchange rates. Such fluctuations could result in our (i) paying higher prices for certain imported goods and services, (ii) realizing lower prices for any sales denominated in currencies other than U.S. dollars, (iii) realizing lower net income, on a U.S. dollar basis, from our international operations due to the effects of translation from weakened functional currencies, and (iv) realizing higher costs to settle transactions denominated in other currencies. Any of these risks could adversely affect our results of

 

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operations and cash flows. Our major foreign currency exposures involve the markets in Western Europe, Canada and Asia.

 

We use forward contracts to manage the currency risk related to business transactions denominated in foreign currencies. We primarily utilize forward exchange contracts with maturities of less than eighteen months. To the extent these transactions are completed, the contracts do not subject us to significant risk from exchange rate fluctuations because they offset gains and losses on the related foreign currency denominated transactions.

 

Item 1B.     Unresolved Staff Comments

 

None

 

Item 2.     Properties

 

We maintain 18 major facilities worldwide, including 16 significant manufacturing operations located in the United States, Canada, Western Europe and the People’s Republic of China. Many of these facilities contain sales offices or warehouses from which we ship finished goods to customers, distributors and commissioned representative organizations. Our executive office is located in Burlington, Massachusetts.

 

The Instrumentation and Thermal Fluid Controls Products Group has facilities located in the United States, Germany, France, the Netherlands, and the United Kingdom. Properties in Ronkonkoma, New York; Berlin, Connecticut; Ontario, California, Le Plessis Trevise, France, and Spartanburg, South Carolina; are leased. The Energy Products Group has facilities located in the United States, Canada, Italy and the People’s Republic of China. Properties in Nerviano, Italy; Naviglio, Italy; Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, Beaumont, Texas; a distribution center in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma are leased. Certain of our facilities are subject to collateral assignments under loan agreements with long-term lenders.

 

In general, we believe that our properties, including machinery, tools and equipment, are in good condition, are well maintained, and are adequate and suitable for their intended uses. Our manufacturing facilities generally operate five days per week on one or two shifts. We believe our manufacturing capacity could be increased by working additional shifts and weekends and by successful implementation of our on-going lean manufacturing initiatives.

 

Item 3.     Legal Proceedings

 

We, like other worldwide manufacturing companies, are subject to a variety of potential liabilities connected with our business operations, including potential liabilities and expenses associated with possible product defects or failures and compliance with environmental laws. We maintain liability insurance coverage which we believe to be consistent with industry practices. Nonetheless, such insurance coverage may not be adequate to protect us fully against substantial damage claims, which may arise from product defects and failures or from environmental liability.

 

We, like many other manufacturers of fluid control products, we have been named as defendants in a growing number of product liability actions brought on behalf of individuals who seek compensation for their alleged exposure to airborne asbestos fibers. In particular, our subsidiaries, Leslie, Spence, and

 

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Hoke, collectively have been named as defendants or third-party defendants in asbestos related claims brought on behalf of approximately 22,000 plaintiffs typically against anywhere from 50 to 400 defendants. In some instances, we also have been named individually and/or as successor in interest to one or more of these subsidiaries. These cases have been brought in state courts in Alabama, California, Connecticut, Georgia, Illinois, Louisiana, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Mississippi, Montana, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Texas, Utah, Virginia, Washington and Wyoming with the vast majority of claimants having brought their claims in Mississippi. The cases brought on behalf of the vast majority of claimants seek unspecified compensatory and punitive damages against all defendants in the aggregate. However, the complaints filed on behalf of claimants who do seek specified compensatory and punitive damages typically seek millions or tens of millions of dollars in damages against the aggregate of defendants.

 

Of the approximately 22,000 plaintiffs who have brought claims against our subsidiaries, all but approximately 600 have been in Mississippi. Recently in Mississippi, the courts have rendered decisions and the legislature has passed legislation aimed at curbing certain abusive practices by plaintiff attorneys pursuant to which large numbers of unrelated plaintiffs (sometimes numbering in the thousands in a single case) would be grouped in the same case against hundreds of defendants. As a result of the recent changes, many of these “mass filings” (including some cases in which CIRCOR companies have been named defendant) have been or are expected to be dismissed. While it is possible that certain dismissed claims would be refiled in Mississippi or in other jurisdictions, any such refilings likely would be made on behalf of one or a small number of related individuals who can demonstrate actual injury and some connection to our subsidiaries’ products.

 

Any components containing asbestos formerly used in Leslie, Spence and Hoke products were entirely internal to the product and, we believe, would not give rise to ambient asbestos dust during normal operation or during normal inspection and repair procedures. Moreover, to date, our insurers have been paying the vast majority of the costs associated with the defense of these actions, particular with respect to Spence and Hoke for which insurance has paid all defense costs to date. As we previously have disclosed, we negotiated a revised cost sharing understanding with Leslie’s insurers which results in Leslie being responsible for 29% of its defense costs. In light of the foregoing, we currently believe that we have no basis on which to conclude that these cases may have a material adverse effect on our financial condition, results of operations or cash flows. However, due to the nature and number of variables associated with asbestos related claims, such as the rate at which new claims may be filed; the availability of insurance policies to continue to recover certain of our costs relating to the defense and payment of these claims; the impact of bankruptcies of other companies currently or historically defending asbestos claims including our co-defendants; the uncertainties surrounding the litigation process from jurisdiction to jurisdiction and from case to case; the impact of potential changes in legislative or judicial standards; the type and severity of the disease alleged to be suffered by each claimant; and increases in the expense of medical treatment, we are unable to reliably estimate the ultimate costs to us of these claims.

 

We have reviewed all of our pending judicial and legal proceedings, reasonably anticipated costs and expenses in connection with such proceedings, and availability and limits of our insurance coverage, and we have established reserves that we believe are appropriate in light of those outcomes that we believe are probable and estimable at this time.

 

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Item 4.     Submission of Matters to a Vote of Security Holders

 

There were no matters submitted during the fourth quarter of the year covered by this Annual Report to a vote of security holders through solicitation of proxies or otherwise.

 

Part II

 

Item 5.     Market for the Registrant’s Common Equity and Related Stockholder Matters

 

Our common stock is traded on the New York Stock Exchange (“NYSE”) under the symbol “CIR”. Quarterly share prices and dividends declared and paid are incorporated herein by reference to Note 18 to the consolidated financial statements included in this Annual Report.

 

During the first quarter of 2006, we declared a dividend of $0.0375 per outstanding common share payable on March 24, 2006 to shareholders of record on March 10, 2006.

 

Our board of directors is responsible for determining our dividend policy. Although we currently intend to continue paying cash dividends, the timing and level of such dividends will necessarily depend on our board of directors’ assessments of earnings, financial condition, capital requirements and other factors, including restrictions, if any, imposed by our lenders. See “Liquidity and Capital Resources” under the section entitled “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” for further information.

 

As of February 16, 2006, there were 15,855,514 shares of our common stock outstanding and we had 103 holders of record of our common stock. We believe the number of beneficial owners of our common stock was substantially greater on that date.

 

In accordance with Section 303A, 12(a) of the NYSE Listed Company Manual, our Chief Executive Officer, on May 26, 2005, filed with the NYSE his certification that he was not aware of any violation by the Company of NYSE corporate governance listing standards.

 

The information appearing under the section “New Benefit Plans” in our Definitive Proxy Statement relating to the Annual Meeting of Stockholders to be held May 2, 2006 is incorporated herein by reference.

 

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Item 6.     Selected Financial Data

 

The following table presents certain selected financial data that has been derived from our audited consolidated financial statements and notes related thereto and should be read along with the section entitled “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” and our audited consolidated financial statements and notes included in this Annual Report.

 

The consolidated statements of operations and consolidated statements of cash flows data for the years ended December 31, 2005, 2004 and 2003, and the consolidated balance sheet data as of December 31, 2005 and 2004 are derived from, and should be read in conjunction with, our audited consolidated financial statements and the related notes included in this Annual Report. The consolidated statements of operations and consolidated statements of cash flows data, and the consolidated balance sheet data as of December 31, 2002 and 2001, are derived from our audited consolidated financial statements not included in this Annual Report.

 

Selected Financial Data

(In thousands, except per share data)

 

     Years Ended December 31,

 
     2005

    2004(3)

    2003

    2002

    2001

 

Statement of Operations Data (1):

                                        

Net revenues

   $ 450,531     $ 381,834     $ 359,453     $ 331,448     $ 343,083  

Gross profit

     132,675       107,569       105,512       98,285       103,477  

Goodwill amortization expense

     –         –         –         –         2,737  

Operating income

     33,005       21,934       29,987       30,374       33,617  

Income before interest and taxes

     32,861       22,168       30,824       31,060       33,096  

Net income

     20,383       11,803       17,873       15,577       15,596  

Balance Sheet Data:

                                        

Total assets

   $ 460,380     $ 428,418     $ 423,863     $ 390,734     $ 386,121  

Total debt (2)

     33,491       42,880       61,059       77,990       97,662  

Shareholders’ equity

     310,723       293,435       275,160       243,659       222,440  

Total capitalization

     344,214       336,315       336,219       321,649       320,102  

Other Financial Data:

                                        

Cash flow provided by (used in):

                                        

Operating activities

   $ 45,326     $ 29,249     $ 58,646     $ 25,057     $ 44,856  

Investing activities

     (60,899 )     (10,107 )     (20,981 )     (23,241 )     (14,501 )

Financing activities

     (10,304 )     (19,536 )     (19,517 )     (20,636 )     18,609  

Net interest expense

     2,810       3,690       5,151       6,721       7,102  

Capital expenditures

     15,021       5,287       6,823       4,418       4,950  

Diluted earnings per common share

   $ 1.27     $ 0.74     $ 1.14     $ 1.00     $ 1.04  

Diluted weighted average common shares outstanding

     16,019       15,877       15,675       15,610       15,023  

Cash dividends declared per common share

   $ 0.15     $ 0.15     $ 0.15     $ 0.15     $ 0.15  

(1)   The statement of operations data for the years ended December 31, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, and 2001 includes, respectively, $1.6 million, $0.3 million, $1.4 million, $0.7 million, and $0.2 million of special charges associated with the closure, consolidation and reorganization of certain manufacturing plants.
(2)   Includes capital leases obligations of: $1.7 million, $0.1 million, and $0.1 million as of December 31, 2005, 2004 and 2003, respectively. We did not have capital lease obligations as of December 31, 2002 and 2001.
(3)   Results for the year ended December 31, 2004 include a $6.6 million pre-tax charge for an inventory write-down related to a change in our warehousing and inventory carrying practices.

 

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Item 7.     Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

 

This Annual Report contains certain statements that are “forward-looking statements” as that term is defined under the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 (the “Act”) and releases issued by the Securities and Exchange Commission. The words “may,” “hope,” “should,” “expect,” “plan,” “anticipate,” “intend,” “believe,” “estimate,” “predict,” “potential,” “continue,” and other expressions which are predictions of or indicate future events and trends and which do not relate to historical matters, identify forward-looking statements. We believe that it is important to communicate our future expectations to our stockholders, and we, therefore, make forward-looking statements in reliance upon the safe harbor provisions of the Act. However, there may be events in the future that we are not able to accurately predict or control, and our actual results may differ materially from the expectations we describe in our forward-looking statements. Forward-looking statements involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors, which may cause our actual results, performance or achievements to differ materially from anticipated future results, performance or achievements expressed or implied by such forward-looking statements. Factors that could cause or contribute to such differences include, but are not limited to, the cyclicality and highly competitive nature of some of our end markets which can affect the overall demand for and pricing of our products, changes in the price of and demand for oil and gas in both domestic and international markets, variability of raw material and component pricing, changes in our suppliers’ performance, fluctuations in foreign currency exchange rates, our ability to continue operating our manufacturing facilities at efficient levels including our ability to continue to reduce costs, our ability to generate increased cash by reducing our inventories, our prevention of the accumulation of excess inventory, our ability to successfully implement our acquisition strategy, increasing interest rates, our ability to continue to successfully defend product liability actions, as well as the uncertain continuing impact on economic and financial conditions in the United States and around the world as a result of terrorist attacks, current Middle Eastern tensions and related matters. We advise you to read further about certain of these and other risk factors set forth under the caption “Certain Risk Factors that May Affect Future Results” in this Annual Report. We undertake no obligation to publicly update or revise any forward-looking statement, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise.

 

Overview

 

CIRCOR International, Inc. is a leading provider of valves and fluid control products for the industrial, aerospace and petrochemical markets. We offer one of the industry’s broadest and most diverse range of products – a range that allows us to supply end-users with a wide array of valves and component products for fluid systems.

 

We have organized the company into two segments: Instrumentation & Thermal Fluid Controls Products and Energy Products. The Instrumentation & Thermal Fluid Controls Products segment serves our broadest variety of end-markets, including military and commercial aerospace, chemical processing, marine, power generation, HVAC systems, food and beverage processing, and other general industrial markets. The Energy Products segment primarily serves the oil and gas exploration, production and distribution markets.

 

Our growth strategy includes both organic sales increases as well as strategic acquisitions that complement and extend our current offering of engineered flow control products. For organic growth,

 

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our businesses focus on developing new products and reacting quickly to changes in market conditions in order to help grow our revenues. Regarding acquisitions, we have made twelve acquisitions in the last five years that extended our product offerings. Ten of these acquisitions were in our Instrumentation & Thermal Fluid Controls Products segment. During the last three years, our acquisitions of DQS and TSI in 2003 provided us with a larger presence in the analytical sampling market. In April 2004, we acquired Mallard; which added to our Energy Products segment and our acquisitions of Loud in January 2005 and Industria in October 2005 provided us with complementary aerospace component and subassembly manufacturing capabilities. In February 2006, we acquired Hale Hamilton, a leading provider of high pressure valves and flow control equipment, and Sagebrush which provides pipeline flow control and measurement equipment to oil and gas markets.

 

Regarding our 2005 financial results, we had a number of improvements over 2004. Our 2005 revenues increased over 2004 and included significant organic growth in many of the key end markets we serve, especially shipments to large international oil and gas projects. Our fiscal 2005 performance also benefited from three strategic acquisitions: Loud and Industria acquired in 2005, plus the full year impact of Mallard, acquired in April 2004. Net income in 2005 increased significantly over 2004, benefiting from the contribution of increased revenues and reduced inventory write-downs. The profit contribution from the higher sales volume plus customer price increases was partially offset by higher costs from new initiatives. For example, in order to further improve our profitability and increase working capital turns, we consolidated additional facilities in 2005 and started implementation of lean manufacturing techniques, beginning with training employees at our larger U.S. plants and conducting associated kaizan events in our internal manufacturing processes. We also continued to further expand our foreign sourcing programs, especially for certain businesses in our Instrumentation and Thermal Fluid Products segment. While all of these initiatives are investments to improve the long-term financial health of the Company, we did incur higher costs in 2005 as a result of these actions. In 2005 we reduced our debt, resulting in a low debt-to-capital ratio of 9.7%, and also reduced working capital, net of cash, to 16.3% of revenues.

 

We also generated a significant amount of cash in 2005. Cash flow from operating activities was $45.3 million, or 10.0% of revenues, an increase of $16.0 million compared to $29.2 million generated in 2004. We continue to believe our largest opportunity to generate increased cash flow from operating activities is by further reducing our inventories. To help us with the lean manufacturing initiatives, we have engaged a consulting firm to assist us with their implementation. With the assistance of this consulting firm, we expect to improve our inventory turns and systemically quicken our order fulfillment processes over the next few years. We also used a significant amount of cash in 2005, including net cash payments of $51.6 million primarily for the Loud and Industria acquisitions and the buyout of the minority interest in SKVC, $15 million on capital expenditures, and a scheduled payment of $15 million to reduce our senior notes. As we ended 2005, we maintained a position of having nearly as much cash and cash equivalents as debt.

 

Basis of Presentation

 

All significant intercompany balances and transactions have been eliminated in consolidation. Certain prior period financial statement amounts have been reclassified to conform to currently reported presentations. We monitor our business in two segments: Instrumentation and Thermal Fluid Controls Products and Energy Products.

 

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We operate and report financial information using a 52-week fiscal year ending December 31. The data periods contained within our Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q reflect the results of operations for the 13-week, 26-week and 39-week periods which generally end on the Sunday nearest the calendar quarter-end date.

 

Critical Accounting Policies

 

The following discussion of accounting policies is intended to supplement the section “Summary of Significant Accounting Policies” presented in Note 2 to our consolidated financial statements. These policies were selected because they are broadly applicable within our operating units. The expenses and accrued liabilities or allowances related to certain of these policies are initially based on our best estimates at the time of original entry in our accounting records. Adjustments are recorded when our actual experience, or new information concerning our expected experience, differs from underlying initial estimates. These adjustments could be material if our actual or expected experience were to change significantly in a short period of time. We make frequent comparisons of actual experience and expected experience in order to mitigate the likelihood of material adjustments.

 

Revenue Recognition

 

Revenue is recognized when products are delivered, title and risk of loss have passed to the customer, no significant post-delivery obligations remain and collection of the resulting receivable is reasonably assured. Shipping and handling costs invoiced to customers are recorded as components of revenues and the associated costs are recorded as cost of revenues.

 

Allowance for Inventory

 

Our net inventory balance was $107.7 million as of December 31, 2005, compared to $105.2 million as of December 31, 2004. Our inventory allowance as of December 31, 2005 was $7.7 million, compared with $14.8 million as of December 31, 2004. The reduction in our inventory allowance in 2005 is primarily attributable to the disposal of inventory included in the 2004 allowance. We provide inventory allowances for excess, slow-moving, and obsolete inventories determined primarily by estimates of future demand. The allowance is measured as the difference between the cost of the inventory and estimated market value and charged to the provision for inventory, which is a component of our cost of revenues. Assumptions about future demand is one of the primary factors utilized to estimate market value. At the point of the loss recognition, a new, lower-cost basis for that inventory is established, and subsequent changes in facts and circumstances do not result in the restoration or increase in that newly established cost basis.

 

Our provision for inventory obsolescence was $3.2 million, $10.7 million, and $4.2 million, for 2005, 2004, and 2003, respectively.

 

If there were to be a sudden and significant decrease in demand for our products, or if there were a higher incidence of inventory obsolescence because of changing technology and customer requirements, we could be required to increase our inventory allowances and our gross profit could be adversely affected.

 

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In the fourth quarter of 2004, we evaluated the impact of our programs initiated during the past two years to increase the proportion of our inventory purchased from less-expensive suppliers, primarily in Asia and Eastern Europe. One result of our successful foreign-sourcing programs is that we need less internal manufacturing and warehousing capability, particularly in North America. In addition, our past practice has been to retain much of our inventory for extended periods, even utilizing extra warehousing facilities and resources. After considering these factors, we concluded that it is more cost effective to dispose of selected inventory and reduce warehouse capacity than to incur ongoing carrying costs. We decided to lower our costs by disposing of certain inventories and consolidating facilities. As a result of that decision, we recorded a pre-tax charge of $6.6 million in the fourth quarter 2004 to write-down our inventories. We disposed of $10.9 million of inventory in 2005.

 

Inventory management remains an area of focus as we balance the need to maintain adequate inventory levels to ensure competitive lead times against the risk of inventory obsolescence because of changing technology and customer requirements.

 

Purchase Accounting

 

In connection with our acquisitions, we assess and formulate a plan related to the future integration of the acquired entity. This process begins during the due diligence process and is concluded within twelve months of the acquisition. We accrue estimates for certain costs, related primarily to personnel reductions and facility closures or restructurings, anticipated at the date of acquisition, in accordance with Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) Statement No. 141 “Business Combinations” and Emerging Issues Task Force Issue No. 95-3, “Recognition of Liabilities in Connection with a Purchase Business Combination.” Adjustments to these estimates are made during the acquisition allocation period, which is generally up to twelve months from the acquisition date as plans are finalized. Subsequent to the allocation period, costs incurred in excess of the recorded acquisition accruals are generally expensed as incurred and if accruals are not utilized for the intended purpose the excess is recorded as an adjustment to the cost of the acquired entity, usually decreasing goodwill.

 

Impairment Analysis

 

Our methodology for allocating the purchase price relating to purchase acquisitions is determined through established valuation techniques for industrial manufacturing companies. Goodwill is measured as the excess of the cost of acquisition over the sum of the amounts assigned to identifiable tangible and intangible assets acquired less liabilities assumed. The goodwill recorded on the consolidated balance sheet as of December 31, 2005 was $140.2 compared with $120.3 million as of December 31, 2004. We perform goodwill impairment tests for each reporting unit on an annual basis and between annual tests in certain circumstances, if triggering events indicate impairment may have occurred. In assessing the fair value of goodwill, we use our best estimates of future cash flows of operating activities and capital expenditures of the reporting unit, a discount rate, and the estimated terminal value for each reporting unit. If these estimates or related projections change in the future due to changes in industry and market conditions, we may be required to record impairment charges. Based on impairment tests performed using independent third-party valuations, there was no impairment in our goodwill in 2005, 2004, or 2003.

 

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Other long-lived assets include property, plant, and equipment and intangibles with definite lives. We perform impairment analyses of our other long-lived assets whenever events and circumstances indicate that they may be impaired. When the undiscounted estimated future cash flows are expected to be less than the carrying value of the assets being reviewed for impairment, the assets are written down to fair market value.

 

Income Taxes

 

Significant management judgment is required in determining our provision for income taxes, deferred tax assets and liabilities and any valuation allowance. Our effective tax rates differ from the statutory rate due to the impact of acquisition-related costs, research and product development tax credits, extraterritorial income exclusion, state taxes, and the tax impact of non-U.S. operations. Our effective tax rate was 32.2%, 36.1%, and 30.4%, for 2005, 2004, and 2003, respectively. For 2006, we expect an effective income tax rate of 32%. Our future effective tax rates could be adversely affected by earnings being lower than anticipated in countries where we have lower statutory rates and vice versa. Changes in the valuation of our deferred tax assets or liabilities, or changes in tax laws or interpretations thereof may also adversely affect our future effective tax rate. In addition, we are subject to the continuous examination of our income tax returns by the Internal Revenue Service and other tax authorities. We regularly assess the likelihood of adverse outcomes resulting from these examinations to determine the adequacy of our provision for income taxes.

 

In 2005, deferred income tax liabilities increased primarily due to purchase accounting adjustments relating to non-goodwill intangibles. The increase in the gross deferred tax asset relating to credit carryforwards resulted from the foreign tax associated with a distribution from one of our foreign subsidiaries, against which we have recorded a valuation allowance.

 

At December 31, 2005, our total valuation allowance is $11.1 million, due to uncertainties related to our ability to utilize deferred tax assets, primarily consisting of certain foreign tax credits, state net operating losses and state tax credits carried forward. The valuation allowance is based on estimates of taxable income in each of the jurisdictions in which we operate and the period over which our deferred tax assets will be recoverable. If market conditions improve and future results of operations exceed our current expectations, our existing tax valuation allowances may be adjusted, resulting in future tax benefits. Alternatively, if market conditions deteriorate further or future results of operations are less than expected, future assessments may result in a determination that some or all of the deferred tax assets are not realizable. As a result, we may need to establish additional tax valuation allowances for all or a portion of the gross deferred tax assets, which may have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.

 

Legal Contingencies

 

We are currently involved in various legal claims and legal proceedings, some of which may involve substantial dollar amounts. Periodically, we review the status of each significant matter and assess our potential financial exposure. If the potential loss from any claim or legal proceeding is considered probable and the amount can be estimated, we accrue a liability for the estimated loss. Significant judgment is required in both the determination of probability and the determination as to whether an

 

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exposure can be reasonably estimated. Because of uncertainties related to these matters, accruals are based on the best information available at the time. As additional information becomes available, we reassess the potential liability related to our pending claims and litigation and may revise our estimates. Such revisions in the estimates of the potential liabilities could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial position. For more information related to our outstanding legal proceedings, see “Contingencies” in Note 14 of the accompanying consolidated financial statements as well as “Legal Proceedings” in Part I Item 3.

 

Pension Benefits

 

We maintain pension benefit plans for our employees in the United States. These plans include significant pension benefit obligations which are calculated based on actuarial valuations. Key assumptions are made in determining these obligations and related expenses, including expected rates of return on plan assets and discount rates. The expected long-term rate of return on plan assets used to estimate pension expenses was 8.5% for 2005 compared to 8.75% in 2004. The discount rate used to estimate the net pension expenses for 2005 was 5.8% compared to 6.0% in 2004. The lower discount rate reflected the decline in global capital markets and interest rates. The combined effect of the reduced expected long-term rate of return and discount rate we utilized for 2005 raised our projected benefit obligation by approximately $0.8 million and raised our 2005 pension expense by approximately $0.1 million.

 

Plan assets are comprised of equity investments of companies in the United States with large and small market capitalizations; fixed income securities issued by the United States government, or its agencies; and certain international equities. There are no common shares of CIRCOR International, Inc. in the plan assets.

 

Unrecognized actuarial gains and losses in excess of the 10% corridor are being recognized over approximately an eleven-year period, which represents the weighted average expected remaining service life of the employee group. Unrecognized actuarial gains and losses arise from several factors including experience and assumption changes in the obligations and from the difference between expected returns and actual returns on assets. At the end of 2005, we had unrecognized net actuarial losses of $7.0 million.

 

The fair value of the defined benefit plan assets at December 31, 2005 exceeded the estimated accumulated benefit obligations primarily as a result of the cash contributions from the company, partially offset by the lower interest rates. See Note (13) to the consolidated financial statements for further information on the benefit plans.

 

During 2005, we made $2.0 million in cash contributions to our defined benefit pension plans. In 2006, we do not expect to make voluntary cash contributions, although global capital market and interest rate fluctuations will impact future funding requirements.

 

For 2006, we lowered our discount rate for pension liabilities by 30 basis points to 5.5% on a weighted average basis given the level of global interest rates. The effect of the reduction in the assumed discount rate is expected to raise our projected benefit obligation by approximately $1.5 million and raise 2006 pension expense by approximately $0.3 million.

 

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We will continue to evaluate our expected long-term rates of return on plan assets and discount rates at least annually and make adjustments as necessary; such adjustments could change the pension and post-retirement obligations and expenses in the future. If the actual operation of the plans differ from the assumptions, additional contributions by us may be required. If we are required to make significant contributions to fund the defined benefit plans, reported results could be materially and adversely affected and our cash flow available for other uses may be reduced.

 

Year Ended December 31, 2005 Compared to the Year Ended December 31, 2004

 

The following tables set forth the results of operations, percentage of net revenue and the period-to-period percentage change in certain financial data for the year ended December 31, 2005 and December 31, 2004:

 

     Year Ended

 
     December 31, 2005

    December 31, 2004

    % Change

 
     (Dollars in thousands)              

Net revenues

   $ 450,531    100.0 %   $ 381,834     100.0 %   18.0 %

Cost of revenues

     317,856    70.6       274,265     71.8     15.9  
    

  

 


 

     

Gross profit

     132,675    29.4       107,569     28.2     23.3  

Selling, general and administrative expenses

     98,040    21.7       85,332     22.3     14.9  

Special charges

     1,630    0.4       303     0.2     437.9  
    

  

 


 

     

Operating income

     33,005    7.3       21,934     5.7     50.5  

Other (income) expense:

                                 

Interest expense, net

     2,810    0.6       3,690     1.0     (23.8 )

Other (income) expense, net

     144    –         (234 )   (0.1 )   (161.5 )
    

  

 


 

     

Total other expense

     2,954    0.7       3,456     0.9     (14.5 )
    

  

 


 

     

Income before income taxes

     30,051    6.7       18,478     4.8     62.6  

Provision for income taxes

     9,668    2.1       6,675     1.7     44.8  
    

  

 


 

     

Net income

   $ 20,383    4.5     $ 11,803     3.1     72.7 %
    

  

 


 

     

 

Net Revenue

 

Net revenues for the year ended December 31, 2005 increased by $68.7 million, or 18.0%, to $450.5 million from $381.8 million for the year ended December 31, 2004. The increase in net revenues for the year ended December 31, 2005 was attributable to the following:

 

Segment


   Year Ended

   Total
Change


   Acquisitions

   Operations

   Foreign
Exchange


 
   December 31,
2005


   December 31,
2004


           
     (In thousands)  

Instrumentation & Thermal Fluid Controls

   $ 251,276    $ 218,656    $ 32,620    $ 22,782    $ 10,298    $ (460 )

Energy

     199,255      163,178      36,077      4,858      30,698      521  
    

  

  

  

  

  


Total

   $ 450,531    $ 381,834    $ 68,697    $ 27,640    $ 40,996    $ 61  
    

  

  

  

  

  


 

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The Instrumentation and Thermal Fluid Controls Products segment accounted for 56% of net revenues for the year ended December 31, 2005 compared to 57% for the year ended December 31, 2004. The Energy Products segment accounted for 44% of net revenues for the year ended December 31, 2005 compared to 43% for the year ended December 31, 2004.

 

Instrumentation and Thermal Fluid Controls Products revenues increased $32.6 million, or 15.0%, for the year ended December 31, 2005 compared to the year ended December 31, 2004. The increase in revenues was the net result of several factors. Revenues increased an incremental $18.6 million from the January 2005 acquisition of Loud and by $4.2 million from the acquisition of Industria in October 2005. The acquisitions were complemented by additional organic increases in product sales to general industrial and chemical processing end markets. Incoming orders increased 5.8%, excluding Loud and Industria, and benefited nearly every business unit stemming largely from higher selling prices instituted by the businesses in the second half of 2004 and in 2005. During mid 2005, we experienced a softening in the commercial HVAC projects market negatively impacting our Thermal Fluid Products group. In 2006, management expects market conditions to remain steady for most of the general industrial, chemical processing and aerospace end markets served by this segment. We expect a revenue increase approximating 4% for the full year 2006 compared to the full year 2005, plus approximately $12 million in incremental revenue from our October 2005 acquisition of Industria and approximately $30 million from our February 2006 acquisition of Hale Hamilton.

 

Energy Products revenues increased by $36.1 million, or 22.1%, for the year ended December 31, 2005 compared to the year ended December 31, 2004. A portion of the increase in revenues was the net result of an incremental $4.9 million from the April 30, 2004 acquisition of Mallard. The acquisition impact also was complemented by additional organic increases in revenues as an escalation in worldwide demand for oil and natural gas motivated producers to increase their drilling, production, and distribution facilities. Revenues from our North American operations increased $10.3 million over 2004, and our Italian subsidiary, Pibiviesse, increased revenues $20.4 million over 2004. Pibiviesse continues to be successful in winning and fulfilling orders for large international oil and gas projects, a majority of which are for national energy companies in the Middle East. In 2006, our expectations for this segment’s revenues are to increase by 5% to 6% over 2005, plus approximately $20 million in incremental revenue from our February 2006 acquisition of Sagebrush.

 

Gross Profit

 

Consolidated gross profit increased $25.1 million, or 23.3%, to $132.7 million for the year ended December 31, 2005 compared to $107.6 million for the year ended December 31, 2004. Consolidated gross margin of 29.4% for the year ended December 31, 2005 was an increase of 120 basis points from the prior year period.

 

Gross profit for the Instrumentation and Thermal Fluid Controls Products segment increased $9.2 million for the year ended December 31, 2005 compared to the prior year and was primarily the result of two factors: $8.0 million primarily from the incremental contribution of the 2005 acquisitions of Loud and Industria, and $1.2 million due to the net benefit of higher volume of shipments and customer price increases partially offset by higher raw material costs, especially stainless steel, unforeseen costs from decreased vendor responsiveness, and lower factory productivity.

 

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Gross profit for the Energy Products segment increased $15.9 million for the year ended December 31, 2005 compared to the year ended December 31, 2004. The gross profit increase was the net effect of: $8.1 million from the higher sales volume and related customer pricing increases, net of additional operating costs to regain manufacturing productivity in our Oklahoma City plant after the summer and fall 2005 consolidation of two other U.S. plants into that facility, selected raw material shortages; a $6.2 million charge in the fourth quarter of 2004 primarily for slow-moving inventory that was not incurred in 2005, and $1.9 million from the April 2004 acquisition of Mallard.

 

Regarding both segments’ gross margins, we had anticipated developing a faster production capability in the key U.S. plants where we began to implement lean manufacturing initiatives which would have enabled us to complete facility consolidation projects more timely. However, added operational costs plus unforeseen constraints on the supply of certain raw materials and the inability of certain suppliers to respond to our increasing needs contributed to gross margins in both segments that were lower than our own expectations. In response to these issues, in 2006, we intend to strengthen our supplier management processes and foreign sourcing programs, re-direct lean initiatives to focus on manufacturing constraints, initiate further facility consolidations, and accelerate rationalization of the manufacturing of certain product lines.

 

Selling, General and Administrative Expenses

 

Selling, general and administrative expenses increased $12.7 million, or 14.9%, to $98.0 million for the year ended December 31, 2005 compared to $85.3 million for the year ended December 31, 2004.

 

Selling, general and administrative expenses for the Instrumentation and Thermal Fluid Controls Products segment increased by $4.4 million primarily as a result from incremental expense from our 2005 acquisitions of Loud and Industria.

 

Selling, general and administrative expenses for the Energy Products segment increased $5.2 million, including $1.2 million from incremental expense from our April 2004 acquisition of Mallard, and $3.8 million in higher expenses in our other ongoing businesses for increased sales personnel plus higher commissions and variable compensation.

 

Corporate general and administrative expenses increased $3.1 million to $13.9 million for the year ended December 31, 2005 compared to $10.8 million the prior year. The increase was primarily from higher compensation related costs, staffing, project consulting fees, and corporate development expenses. Regarding corporate expenses, our 2006 estimate includes incremental equity-based compensation, compared to 2005. We will adopt the new accounting rule, (FAS 123(R)), requiring the expensing of stock options, which will include an additional pretax expense of $1.3 million or $0.05 per diluted share. We are also expecting an incremental pretax cost of $0.9 million or $0.04 per diluted share for restricted share units to be granted in 2006. These equity-based compensation increases will be partially offset by other 2006 expected reductions in consulting fees, variable compensation and audit fees.

 

Special Charges

 

Special charges of $1.6 million were recognized for the year ended December 31, 2005 compared to $0.3 million for the year ended December 31, 2004. The special charges recognized in the year ended

 

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December 31, 2005 primarily related to severance charges of $1.7 million incurred in connection with our announced consolidation and reduction in force at our Mallard, SART and European Instrumentation businesses, offset by the release of a $0.1 million accrual for facility closure related costs recorded in 2004.

 

Operating Income

 

The change in operating income for the year ended December 31, 2005 compared to the year ended December 31, 2004 was as follows:

 

     Year Ended

                      

Segment


   December 31,
2005


    December 31,
2004


    Total
Change


    Acquisitions

   Operations

    Foreign
Exchange


     (In thousands)

Instrumentation & Thermal Fluid Controls

   $ 27,842     $ 23,971     $ 3,872     $ 4,059    $ (433 )   $ 246

Energy

     19,081       8,793       10,288       710      9,471       108

Corporate

     (13,918 )     (10,830 )     (3,089 )     –        (3,089 )     –  
    


 


 


 

  


 

Total

   $ 33,005     $ 21,934     $ 11,071     $ 4,769    $ 5,949     $ 354
    


 


 


 

  


 

 

Operating income increased $11.0 million, or 50.5%, to $33.0 million for the year ended December 31, 2005 from $21.9 million for the year ended December 31, 2004.

 

Operating income for the Instrumentation and Thermal Fluid Controls Products segment for the year ended December 31, 2005 increased $3.9 million. The increase included the acquisitions of Loud and Industria, customer price increases that became effective in the second half of 2004 and during 2005, savings from facility closings completed in the first half of 2004, and was partially offset by the sale of higher cost inventory containing stainless steel and related specialty alloys, unforeseen costs from decreased vendor performance, and lower factory productivity.

 

Operating income for the Energy Products segment increased $10.3 million, or 117% for the year ended December 31, 2005, primarily due to a $6.2 million charge in the fourth quarter of 2004 primarily related to charges in warehousing and inventory carrying practices, higher volume of shipments by the North American and Pibiviesse business units, the incremental contribution from the April 2004 Mallard acquisition, partially offset by higher expenses in our ongoing businesses for increased sales personnel plus higher commissions and variable compensation.

 

In 2006, based on our expected revenue increases over 2005, we anticipate full year 2006 adjusted operating margins, which excludes the impact of special charges, in the Instrumentation and Thermal Fluid Controls Products Segment to approximate 11% to 12% and the Energy Products Segment to approximate 10% to 11%. Both segments are expected to continue to be affected by keen competitive pricing, high raw material and energy costs as well as facility consolidation costs.

 

Interest Expense, Net

 

Interest expense, net, decreased $0.9 million to $2.8 million for the year ended December 31, 2005 compared to approximately $3.7 million for the year ended December 31, 2004. The reduction in net

 

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interest expense was primarily due to the $15.0 million lower outstanding balance of our senior unsecured notes since the principal payment in October 2004, partially offset by lower interest income in 2005 associated with lower invested cash, cash equivalents and investments in 2005 as compared to 2004.

 

Provision for Taxes

 

The effective tax rate was 32.2% for the year ended December 31, 2005 which was a 3.9% decrease from the 36.1% used for the year ended December 31, 2004. This effective tax rate reduction is due to higher domestic and international tax benefits and credits in 2005. The increase in income taxes in the year ended December 31, 2005 compared to the year ended December 31, 2004 was due to higher income before income taxes this year offset by the lower tax rate.

 

Net Income

 

Net income increased $8.6 million to $20.4 million for the year ended December 31, 2005 compared to $11.8 million for the year ended December 31, 2004. This net increase is primarily attributable to the 2004 after tax charge for inventory of $4.3 million related to changes in our warehousing and inventory carrying practices, incremental profit from acquisitions, customer price increases, higher volume shipments, cost reductions from closed facilities, a lower income tax rate and lower net interest expense offset by the sale of higher cost inventory containing stainless steel and related specialty alloys, production difficulties as we implement lean manufacturing processes and consolidate facilities, unabsorbed manufacturing costs resulting from inventory reductions, unforeseen costs from decreased vendor performance, and higher selling, commissions and corporate expenses.

 

Year Ended December 31, 2004 Compared to the Year Ended December 31, 2003

 

In 2004, many of the general industrial end markets we serve began to emerge from a multiple year slump. The stronger foreign currencies such as the Euro continued a positive effect on our 2004 financial results as well as the full year impact of the acquisitions of DQS and TSI purchased in the fourth quarter of 2003. We also acquired Mallard in April 2004 which added to our 2004 financial results. In 2004, the majority of our businesses focused on trimming spending proportional to customer order rates, completing the consolidation of three facilities and closing a fourth facility, developing new products and improving customer service levels to maintain and increase market share.

 

In the fourth quarter 2004, we evaluated the impact of our programs initiated during the past two years to increase the proportion of our inventory purchased from less-expensive suppliers, primarily in Asia and Eastern Europe. One result of our successful foreign-sourcing programs is that we need less internal manufacturing and warehousing capability, particularly in North America. In addition, our past practice has been to retain much of our inventory for extended periods, even utilizing extra warehousing facilities and resources. After considering these factors, we concluded that it is more cost effective to dispose of selected inventory and reduce warehouse capacity than to incur ongoing carrying costs. We decided to lower our costs by disposing of certain inventories and consolidating facilities. As a result of that decision, we recorded a pre-tax charge of $6.6 million in the fourth quarter 2004 to write down our inventories, the majority of which we disposed in 2005.

 

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As a result of these and other factors, 2004 net revenues increased over 2003 while operating income and 2004 net income decreased from 2003.

 

The following tables set forth the results of operations, percentage of net revenues and the yearly percentage change in certain financial data for the years ended December 31, 2004 and 2003 (In thousands):

 

     Year Ended December 31,

       
     2004

    2003

    % Change

 

Net revenues

   $ 381,834     100.0 %   $ 359,453     100.0 %   6.2 %

Cost of revenues

     274,265     71.8       253,941     70.6     8.0  
    


 

 


 

     

Gross profit

     107,569     28.2       105,512     29.4     1.9  

Selling, general and administrative expenses

     85,332     22.3       74,162     20.6     15.1  

Special charges

     303     0.2       1,363     0.5     (77.8 )
    


 

 


 

     

Operating income

     21,934     5.7       29,987     8.3     (26.9 )

Other (income) expense:

                                  

Interest expense, net

     3,690     1.0       5,151     1.4     (28.4 )

Other income, net

     (234 )   (0.1 )     (837 )   (0.2 )   (72.0 )
    


 

 


 

     

Income before income taxes

     18,478     4.8       25,673     7.1     (28.0 )

Provision for income taxes

     6,675     1.7       7,800     2.1     (14.4 )
    


 

 


 

     

Net income

   $ 11,803     3.1 %   $ 17,873     5.0 %   (34.0 )%
    


 

 


 

     

 

Net Revenues

 

Net revenues for the year ended December 31, 2004 increased by approximately $22.4 million, or 6.2%, to $381.8 million compared to $359.5 million for the year ended December 31, 2003. The increase in net revenues for the year ended December 31, 2004 was attributable to the following (In thousands):

 

Segment


   2004

   2003

  

Total

Change


   Acquisitions

   Operations

    Foreign
Exchange


Instrumentation & Thermal Fluid Controls

   $ 218,656    $ 200,775    $ 17,881    $ 11,317    $ 1,777     $ 4,787

Energy

     163,178      158,678      4,500      8,306      (9,870 )     6,064
    

  

  

  

  


 

Total

   $ 381,834    $ 359,453    $ 22,381    $ 19,623    $ (8,093 )   $ 10,851
    

  

  

  

  


 

 

The Instrumentation and Thermal Fluid Controls Products segment accounted for 57.3% and 55.9% of net revenues for the year ended December 31, 2004 and December 31, 2003, respectively. The Energy Products segment accounted for 42.7% and 44.1% of net revenues for the year ended December 31, 2004 and December 31, 2003, respectively. The change in the composition of revenues was favorably influenced by foreign exchange rate changes and the incremental revenues added from the fourth quarter 2003 acquisitions of DQS and TSI in the Instrumentation and Thermal Fluid Controls Products segment, and the April 2004 acquisition of Mallard in the Energy Products segment. Revenues in 2004 for both

 

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segments were helped by customer price increases implemented by most of our business units. This was the first time in recent years that we had implemented broad based price increases across many of our business units as a response to rising metals costs for raw materials that we purchased in 2004.

 

Instrumentation and Thermal Fluid Controls Products revenues increased $17.9 million, or 8.9%, to $218.7 million for the year ended December 31, 2004 as compared to $200.8 million for the year ended December 31, 2003. Revenues increased primarily due to the incremental $11.3 million of revenue contributed by the acquisitions of DQS and TSI, plus $4.8 million due to the effect of favorable foreign exchange rates changes. The revenue increase from operations of $1.8 million was primarily the result of higher 2004 revenues from aerospace product lines of $3.4 million, partially offset by a $1.8 million decrease in revenues from Thermal Fluid Controls product sales to the maritime market. We implemented customer price increases in most businesses in the second and third quarters of 2004 to help offset the rise in certain metal prices from vendors.

 

Energy Products revenues increased $4.5 million, or 2.8%, to $163.2 million for the year ended December 31, 2004 as compared to $158.7 million for the year ended December 31, 2003. The net increase in revenues for this segment was the net result of the Mallard acquisition which added $8.3 million of revenues and favorable foreign exchange rate changes which provided an additional $6.1 million of revenue, partially offset by $9.9 million of lower shipments to large international oil and gas projects during the second and third quarters of 2004.

 

Gross Profit

 

Gross profit from the Instrumentation and Thermal Fluid Controls Products segment increased $6.5 million for the year ended December 31, 2004 compared to the year ended December 31, 2003. This increase was primarily the result of the incremental gross profit of $6.4 million from the acquisitions of DQS and TSI in November and December 2003. The increase from acquisitions was supplemented by increases of $1.6 million from the foreign exchange effect of the stronger Euro and British Pound Sterling in 2004. The remaining gross profit decline of $1.5 million from 2003 is the net result of several factors including: lower unit volume to the maritime and general industrial customers; higher unit volume to aerospace customers; added manufacturing costs for three now-completed plant consolidations; higher raw material costs due to rising metals prices, partially offset by customer price increases instituted and affecting second half 2004 revenues; and a fourth quarter 2004 $0.9 million charge for inventory on the business decision to change warehousing and inventory carrying practices.

 

Gross profit for the Energy Products segment decreased a net $4.4 million for the year ended December 31, 2004 compared to the year ended December 31, 2003. Gross profit declined from 2003 from a $5.7 million charge in the fourth quarter of 2004, related to our decision to change our warehousing and inventory carrying practices, and by $3.0 million from lower unit volume and unfavorable mix of shipments to large international oil and gas projects and higher raw material costs due to rising metals prices, partially offset by customer price increases instituted and affecting second half 2004 revenues. These negative factors were offset by gross profit increases of $2.7 million from the Mallard acquisition plus a $1.5 million increase from the strengthened Euro and Canadian dollar.

 

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Selling, General and Administrative Expenses

 

Selling, general and administrative expenses increased $11.2 million, or 15.1%, to $85.3 million, or 22.3% of net revenues for the year ended December 31, 2004 from $74.2 million, or 20.6% of net revenues for the year ended December 31, 2003.

 

Selling, general and administrative expenses for the Instrumentation and Thermal Fluid Controls Products segment increased by $5.6 million for the year ended December 31, 2004 as compared to the year ended December 31, 2003. Increases were the result of $4.5 million from the incremental expenses of our acquisitions in the fourth quarter 2003 of DQS and TSI, and a $1.2 million increase due to changes in foreign exchange rates.

 

Energy Products segment selling, general and administrative expenses increased by $2.1 million for the year ended December 31, 2004 as compared to the year ended December 31, 2003. This increase was the net result of $2.0 million of incremental costs due to our Mallard acquisition and $0.8 million of increases due to changes in foreign currency exchange rates, partially offset by a net $0.6 million in lower operating costs incurred in our North American operations.

 

Corporate expenses increased by $3.4 million to $10.8 million for the year ended December 31, 2004 from $7.4 million for the year ended December 31, 2003. The increase was primarily for compliance costs for the new requirements of Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002. Our efforts in 2004 entailed testing internal controls and documenting those test results at our most significant businesses.

 

Special Charges

 

Special charges of $0.3 million incurred during the twelve months ended December 31, 2004 were primarily related to the write-down of a building classified as held for sale within our Energy Products segment. During the third quarter 2004 it was determined that the fair value and other incremental costs to sell the building would result in a lower net realizable value of the asset held for sale. Special charges of less than $0.1 million incurred during the first quarter 2004 were primarily severance and facility costs related to the announced closure and consolidation of a California facility within our Instrumentation and Thermal Fluid Controls Products segment of $0.2 million, $0.1 million of other closure related items, offset by the gain on the sale of our Ohio property of $0.2 million, also within our Instrumentation and Thermal Fluid Controls Products segment. As a result of the closure of our California facility, 5 employee positions were eliminated. Special charges of $1.4 million incurred during the year ended December 31, 2003 were primarily related to incremental costs for the closure of an Ohio facility within our Instrumentation and Thermal Fluid Controls Products segment and a building write-down within our Energy Products segment.

 

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Operating Income

 

The change in operating income for the year ended December 31, 2004 compared to the year ended December 31, 2003 was as follows (In thousands):

 

Segment


   2004

    2003

    Total
Change


    Acquisitions

   Operations

    Foreign
Exchange


Instrumentation & Thermal Fluid Controls

   $ 23,971     $ 22,218     $ 1,753     $ 1,903    $ (564 )   $ 414

Energy

     8,793       15,151       (6,358 )     644      (7,776 )     774

Corporate

     (10,830 )     (7,382 )     (3,448 )     –        (3,448 )     –  
    


 


 


 

  


 

Total

   $ 21,934     $ 29,987     $ (8,053 )   $ 2,547    $ (11,788 )   $ 1,188
    


 


 


 

  


 

 

Operating income for the Instrumentation and Thermal Fluid Controls Products segment for the year ended December 31, 2004 increased $1.8 million, or 7.9%, compared to the year ended December 31, 2003. The increase in operating income was due to incremental operating income from our DQS and TSI acquisitions of $1.9 million and $0.4 million of favorable foreign exchange rate movements and operational items of $0.3 million primarily due to improved aerospace products performance. These increases were offset by the fourth quarter 2004 inventory charge of $0.9 million which related to changes in our warehousing and inventory carrying practices.

 

Operating income for the Energy Products segment decreased $6.4 million, or 42.0% for the year ended December 31, 2004, primarily as a result of the fourth quarter 2004 inventory charge of $5.7 million related to changes in our warehousing and inventory carrying practices. In addition, higher raw material costs and lower second and third quarter 2004 product shipments to large international oil and gas projects were offset by favorable foreign exchange rates of $0.8 million and the Mallard acquisition which added $0.6 million of operating income.

 

Interest Expense, net

 

Interest expense, net decreased $1.5 million to $3.7 million for the year ended December 31, 2004 compared to $5.2 million for the year ended December 31, 2003. The reduction in interest expense was primarily due to the $15.0 million annual principal payments against our senior unsecured notes in October of 2003 and 2004 which reduced our outstanding balance.

 

Other Income, net

 

Other income, net decreased $0.6 million from $0.8 million for the year ended December 31, 2003 to $0.2 for the year ended December 31, 2004. The change was primarily attributable to a reduction of foreign currency exchange gains.

 

Provision for Taxes

 

The effective tax rate for the year ended December 31, 2004 was 36.1% compared to 30.4% for the same period last year. The lower 2003 effective tax rate benefited from income tax benefits recorded in

 

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the fourth quarter of 2003 totaling $1.2 million, which included tax credits for product development and research activities, the majority of which related to prior years and a reduction of our income tax liability for certain items. The benefits recorded in the fourth quarter of 2003 coincided with the completion of the Internal Revenue Service’s examination of our U.S. federal income tax returns for the two and one half months ended December 31, 1999, and the years ended December 31, 2000 and 2001.

 

Net Income

 

Net income decreased $6.1 million to $11.8 million for the year ended December 31, 2004 compared to $17.9 million for the year ended December 31, 2003. This net decrease is primarily attributable to the fourth quarter 2004 after-tax charge for inventory of $4.3 million related to changes in our warehousing and inventory carrying practices, increased corporate expenses to comply with the new requirements of Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, and net higher metal costs for raw materials.

 

Liquidity and Capital Resources

 

Our liquidity needs arise primarily from capital investment in machinery, equipment and the improvement of facilities, funding working capital requirements to support business growth initiatives, acquisitions, dividend payments, pension funding obligations and debt service costs. We continue to generate cash from operations and remain in a strong financial position, with resources available for reinvestment in existing businesses, strategic acquisitions and managing our capital structure on a short and long-term basis.

 

The following table summarizes our cash flow activities for the periods indicated (In thousands):

 

     Year Ended
December 31,


 
     2005

    2004

 

Cash flow provided by (used in):

                

Operating activities

   $ 45,326     $ 29,249  

Investing activities

     (60,899 )     (10,107 )

Financing activities

     (10,304 )     (19,536 )

Effect of exchange rates on cash balances

     (1,664 )     845  
    


 


Increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents

   $ (27,541 )   $ 451  
    


 


 

During the twelve months ended December 31, 2005, we generated $45.3 million in cash flow from operating activities which was significantly higher than 2004 primarily due to increases in profitability and higher amounts of accrued liabilities offset by higher accounts receivable.

 

The $60.9 million used by investing activities included $51.6 million used for acquisitions. The acquisitions included $34.5 million cash for all the stock of Loud in January 2005; $9.5 million for all the stock of Industria; $6.8 million for the 40% of stock in our Chinese joint venture that we did not own, and $0.8 million of releases from restricted escrow for prior year acquisitions. To fund these acquisitions, we used $49.0 million of our cash and cash equivalents and borrowed $2.0 million from

 

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our revolving credit facility that was repaid in February 2005. Our 2005 capital expenditures were $15.0 million. Approximately $7.0 million of that capital expenditure total was for new products, cost savings and equipment upgrades. Another $7.4 million dollars was used to purchase two new facilities, one in Europe to co-locate the consolidation of smaller Instrumentation and Thermal Fluid Controls Products facilities, and a new plant in China, to replace the smaller SKVC’s facility operated by our Energy Products segment. For the new plant in China, we expect to receive Chinese government relocation benefits of approximately $1.5 million to aid in the relocation to our new, larger site.

 

We used $10.3 million of cash in financing activities that included: a net $11.7 million payment of debt balances and another $2.4 million used to pay dividends to shareholders, offset by $3.8 million of proceeds from the exercise of stock options.

 

The ratio of current assets to current liabilities was 1.9:1 at December 31, 2005 and 2.8:1 at December 31, 2004. Cash and cash equivalents were $31.1 million as of December 31, 2005 compared to $58.7 million as of December 31, 2004. Total debt as a percentage of total equity was 10.8% as of December 31, 2005 compared to 14.6% as of December 31, 2004.

 

In December 2005, we entered into a new five-year, unsecured bank agreement that provided a $95 million revolving line of credit and we terminated the previously available $75 million line of credit. As of December 31, 2005 and 2004, we had no outstanding borrowings against the respective lines of credit. The $95 million revolving line of credit is available to support our acquisition program, working capital requirements and general corporate purposes. We borrowed approximately $56.0 million in February 2006 to fund our acquisitions of Hale Hamilton and Sagebrush.

 

Certain of our loan agreements contain covenants that require, among other items, maintenance of certain financial ratios and also limit our ability to: enter into secured and unsecured borrowing arrangements; issue dividends to shareholders; acquire and dispose of businesses; transfer assets among domestic and international entities; participate in certain higher yielding long-term investment vehicles; and issue additional shares of our stock. We were in compliance with all covenants related to our existing debt obligations at December 31, 2005 and 2004. In October 2002, 2003, 2004, and 2005 we made the first, second, third and fourth of our five $15.0 million annual payments reducing the $75.0 million original outstanding principal balance of our unsecured 8.23% senior notes which mature in October 2006. The outstanding principal balance due on these senior notes was $15.0 million as of December 31, 2005.

 

We have generated net income and positive cash flow from operating activities since the company was formed in October 1999. In 2006, we expect cash flow from operating activities to exceed $45 million, with expected uses for capital expenditures of nearly $11 million, $15 million for the final payment of the 8.23% senior notes, and dividends approximating $2.5 million based on our current dividend practice of paying $0.15 per share annually. We continue to search for strategic acquisitions in the flow control market. A larger acquisition may require additional borrowings and or the issuance of our common stock.

 

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The following table summarizes our significant contractual obligations and commercial commitments at December 31, 2005 that affect our liquidity:

 

     Payments due by Period

(In thousands)    Total

   Less Than
1 Year


   1 – 3
Years


   3 – 5
Years


   Thereafter

Contractual Cash Obligations:

                                  

Notes payable

   $ 215    $ 215    $ –      $ –      $ –  

Current portion of long-term debt

     26,998      26,998      –        –        –  
    

  

  

  

  

Total short-term borrowings

     27,213      27,213      –        –        –  

Long-term debt, less current portion

     6,278      –        690      486      5,102

Interest payments on debt

     3,581      1,443      328      164      1,646

Operating leases

     13,518      4,370      6,431      2,605      112
    

  

  

  

  

Total contractual cash obligations

   $ 50,590    $ 33,026    $ 7,449    $ 3,255    $ 6,860
    

  

  

  

  

Other Commercial Commitments:

                                  

U.S. standby letters of credit

   $ 3,404    $ 3,404    $ –      $ –      $ –  

International standby letters of credit

     8,549      3,118      4,194      1,237      –  

Commercial contract commitments

     52,829      49,460      1,602      306      1,461
    

  

  

  

  

Total commercial commitments

   $ 64,782    $ 55,982    $ 5,796    $ 1,543    $ 1,461
    

  

  

  

  

 

The most significant of our contractual cash obligations at December 31, 2005 related to our unsecured 8.23% senior notes totaling $15.0 million. We have one annual principal payment remaining of $15.0 million, payable on October 19, 2006. One of our industrial revenue bonds totaling $7.5 million is due in the fourth quarter of 2006. The interest on these unsecured 8.23% senior notes, as well as interest on certain of our other debt balances, with scheduled repayment dates between 2006 and 2019 and interest rates ranging between 1.60% and 6.25%, have been included in the Interest Payments on Debt line within the Contractual Cash Obligations schedule.

 

The most significant of our commercial contract commitments includes approximately $49.6 million of commitments related to open purchase orders. All but approximately $1.2 million of these open purchase orders are not expected to extend beyond 2006. As of December 31, 2005 we did not have any open purchase order commitments that extend beyond 2006.

 

We contributed $2.0 million and $2.3 million to our pension plan trust during the fiscal years ended December 31, 2005 and 2004, respectively, and we do not expect to make plan contributions for 2006. The estimates for plan funding for future periods may change as a result of the uncertainties concerning the return on plan assets, the number of plan participants, and other changes in actuarial assumptions.

 

Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements

 

We have no off-balance sheet arrangements, other than operating leases, that have or are reasonably likely to have a current or future effect on our financial condition, changes in financial condition, revenues or expenses, results of operations, liquidity, capital expenditures, or capital resources that is material to investors.

 

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New Accounting Standards

 

In December 2004, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) issued FASB Statement No. 123 (R) “Shared Base Payment: an amendment of FASB Statements No. 123 and 95”. FASB Statement 123R requires companies to recognize in the income statement the grant-date fair value of stock options and other equity-based compensation issued to employees, but expresses no preference for a type of valuation model. The Statement is effective for CIRCOR’s interim and annual periods beginning after December 31, 2005. See Note 11 to the consolidated financial statements for further information.

 

In December 2004, the FASB issued Statement No. 153, “Exchanges of Nonmonetary Assets”, which is effective for fiscal years beginning after June 15, 2005. FASB Statement No. 153 amends APB 29, Accounting for Nonmonetary Transactions. FASB Statement No. 153 is based on the principle that exchanges of nonmonetary assets should be measured based on the fair value of the assets exchanged. The guidance in APB 29 included certain exceptions to that principle. FASB Statement No. 153 amends APB 29 to eliminate the exception for nonmonetary exchanges of similar productive assets and replaces it with a general exception for exchanges of nonmonetary assets that do not have commercial substance. A nonmonetary exchange has commercial substance if the future cash flows of the entity are expected to change significantly as a result of the exchange. The adoption of this statement did not impact our financial position or results of operations.

 

In November 2004, the FASB issued Statement No. 151, “Inventory Costs, to amend the guidance in Chapter 4”. FASB Statement No.151 clarifies the accounting for abnormal amounts of idle facility expense, freight, handling costs, and wasted material. The Statement requires that those items be recognized as current-period charges. Additionally, FASB Statement No. 151 requires that allocation of fixed production overheads to the costs of conversion be based on the normal capacity of the production facilities. The Statement is effective for inventory costs incurred during fiscal years beginning after June 15, 2005. The adoption of this standard is not expected to impact our financial position or results of operations.

 

Item 7A.    Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk

 

Market Risk

 

The oil and gas markets historically have been subject to cyclicality depending upon supply and demand for crude oil, its derivatives and natural gas. When oil or gas prices decrease expenditures on maintenance and repair decline rapidly and outlays for exploration and in-field drilling projects decrease and, accordingly, demand for valve products is reduced. However, when oil and gas prices rise, maintenance and repair activity and spending for facilities projects normally increase and we benefit from increased demand for valve products. However, oil or gas price increases may be considered temporary in nature or not driven by customer demand and, therefore, may result in longer lead times for increases in petrochemical sales orders. As a result, the timing and magnitude of changes in market demand for oil and gas valve products are difficult to predict. Similarly, although not to the same extent as the oil and gas markets, the general industrial, chemical processing, aerospace, military and maritime markets have historically experienced cyclical fluctuations in demand that also could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition or results of operations.

 

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Interest Rate Sensitivity Risk

 

As of December 31, 2005, our primary interest rate risk is related to borrowings under our revolving credit facility and our industrial revenue bonds. The interest rates for our revolving credit facility and industrial revenue bonds fluctuate with changes in short-term borrowing rates. There were no borrowings under our revolving credit facility outstanding as of December 31, 2005. As of February 20, 2006 we have $61 million borrowed under our revolving credit facility. Based upon expected levels of borrowings under our credit facility in 2006 and our current balances for industrial revenue bonds, an increase in variable interest rates of 100 basis points would have an effect on our annual results of operations and cash flows of approximately $0.4 million.

 

Foreign Currency Exchange Risk

 

We use forward contracts to manage the currency risk related to certain business transactions denominated in foreign currencies. Related gains and losses are recognized when hedged transactions affect earnings, which are generally in the same period as the underlying foreign currency denominated transactions. To the extent these transactions are completed, the contracts do not subject us to significant risk from exchange rate movements because they offset gains and losses on the related foreign currency denominated transactions. As of December 31, 2005, we did not have any forward contracts to buy or sell foreign currencies. There were no unrealized gains attributable to foreign currency forward contracts at December 31, 2005 and 2004. The counterparties to these contracts are major financial institutions. Our risk of loss in the event of non-performance by the counterparties is not significant.

 

We do not use derivative financial instruments for trading purposes. Risk management strategies are reviewed and approved by senior management before implementation.

 

Item 8.    Financial Statements and Supplementary Data

 

CIRCOR INTERNATIONAL, INC

Index to Consolidated Financial Statements

 

     Page

Reports of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm

   51

Consolidated Balance Sheets as of December 31, 2005 and 2004

   54

Consolidated Statements of Operations for the years ended December 31, 2005, 2004 and 2003

   55

Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows for the years ended December 31, 2005, 2004 and 2003

   56

Consolidated Statements of Shareholders’ Equity for the years ended December 31, 2005, 2004 and 2003

   57

Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements

   58

 

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Item 9.    Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure

 

None

 

Item 9A.     Controls and Procedures

 

Evaluation of Disclosure Controls and Procedures

 

Our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer (our principal executive officer and principal financial officer, respectively) have evaluated the effectiveness of our disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in Rules 13a-15(e) and 15d-15(e) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934) as of the end of the period covered by this annual report on Form 10-K. Based on this evaluation, our principal executive officer and principal financial officer have concluded that, as of the end of the period covered by this report, the Company’s disclosure controls and procedures were designed and were effective to give reasonable assurance that information we disclose in reports that we file or submit under the Securities and Exchange Act of 1934 is accumulated and communicated to management including our principal executive and financial officers, to allow timely decisions regarding disclosure and that such information is recorded, processed, summarized and reported, within the time periods specified in the Securities and Exchange Commission’s rules and forms.

 

In our Forms 10-Q for the periods ended April 3, 2005, July 3, 2005 and October 2, 2005, we excluded the acquisition of Loud from our evaluation of disclosure controls and procedures. In evaluating Loud’s disclosure controls and procedures, we did not identify any disclosure controls and procedures that were not encompassed by Loud’s internal control over financial reporting. During each of the fiscal quarters ended April 3, 2005, July 3, 2005 and October 2, 2005 and for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2005, Loud represented approximately 4% of our total year-to-date net revenue and 8% of our total net assets, respectively.

 

Changes in Internal Control Over Financial Reporting

 

There were no significant changes in our internal control over financial reporting that occurred during the quarter ended December 31, 2005 that could materially affect, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.

 

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Management’s Report on Internal Control Over Financial Reporting

 

Our management is responsible for establishing and maintaining adequate internal control over financial reporting, as such term is defined in Exchange Act Rule 13a-15(f) and 15d-15(f). Under the supervision and with the participation of our management, including our principal executive officer and principal financial officer, we conducted an evaluation of the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting based on the framework in Internal Control – Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission. Based on our evaluation under the framework in Internal Control – Integrated Framework, our management concluded that our internal control over financial reporting was effective as of December 31, 2005. Management’s evaluation of internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2005 excluded an evaluation of the internal control over financial reporting of Loud Engineering and Manufacturing, Inc and Industria S.A. which we acquired in January and October 2005, respectively. Loud and Industria’s combined total revenues of $22.8 million and total assets of $54.9 million are included in the consolidated financial statements of the Company and its subsidiaries as of and for the year ended December 31, 2005.

 

Our management’s assessment of the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2005 has been audited by KPMG LLP, an independent registered public accounting firm, as stated in their report which is included herein.

 

Item 9B.

 

None

 

Part III

 

Item 10.     Directors and Executive Officers of the Registrant

 

The information appearing under the sections “Information Regarding Directors” and “Information Regarding Executive Officers” in our Definitive Proxy Statement relating to the Annual Meeting of Stockholders to be held on May 2, 2006 is incorporated herein by reference.

 

Item 11.     Executive Compensation

 

The information appearing under the section “Executive Compensation” in our Definitive Proxy Statement relating to the Annual Meeting of Stockholders to be held May 2, 2006 is incorporated herein by reference.

 

Item 12.     Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters

 

The information appearing under the section “Security Ownership of CIRCOR Common Stock by Certain Beneficial Owners, Directors and Executive Officers of the Company” in our Definitive Proxy Statement relating to the Annual Meeting of Stockholders to be held May 2, 2006 is incorporated herein by reference.

 

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Item 13.    Certain Relationships and Related Transactions

 

The information appearing under the section “Certain Relationships and Related Transactions” in our Definitive Proxy Statement relating to the Annual Meeting of Stockholders to be held May 2, 2006 is incorporated herein by reference.

 

Item 14.    Principal Accountant Fees and Services

 

This information appearing under the section “Principal Accountant Fees and Services” in our Definitive Proxy Statement relating to the Annual Meeting of Stockholders to be held May 2, 2006 is incorporated herein by reference.

 

Part IV

 

Item 15.    Exhibits and Financial Statement Schedules

 

(a)(1)    Financial Statements

 

The financial statements filed as part of the report are listed in Part II, Item 8 of this report on the Index to Consolidated Financial Statements.

 

(a)(2)    Financial Statement Schedules

 

     Page

Schedule II Valuation and Qualifying Accounts for the years ended December 31, 2005, 2004 and 2003

   89

 

All schedules for which provision is made in the applicable accounting regulations of the Security and Exchange Commission are not required under the related instructions or are not material, and therefore have been omitted.

 

(a)(3)    Exhibits UPDATE

 

Exhibit

No.


  

Description and Location


2   

Plan of Acquisition, Reorganization, Arrangement, Liquidation or Succession:

2.1   

Distribution Agreement between Watts Industries, Inc. and CIRCOR International, Inc. dated as of October 1, 1999, is incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 2.1 to Amendment No. 2 to CIRCOR International, Inc.’s Registration Statement on Form 10, File No. 000-26961 (“Form 10”), filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on October 6, 1999 (“Amendment No. 2 to the Form 10”).

3   

Articles of Incorporation and By-Laws:

3.1   

The Amended and Restated Certificate of Incorporation of CIRCOR International, Inc. is incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 3.1 to the Form 10.

 

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Exhibit

No.


  

Description and Location


3.2   

The Amended and Restated By-Laws of CIRCOR International, Inc. are incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 3.2 to the Form 10.

3.3   

Certificate of Designations, Preferences and Rights of a Series of Preferred Stock of CIRCOR International, Inc. classifying and designating the Series A Junior Participating Cumulative Preferred Stock is incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 3.1 to CIRCOR International, Inc.’s Registration Statement on Form 8-A, File No. 001 – 14962, filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on October 21, 1999 (“Form 8-A”).

4   

Instruments Defining the Rights of Security Holders, Including Debentures:

4.1   

Shareholder Rights Agreement, dated as of September 16, 1999, between CIRCOR International, Inc. and BankBoston, N.A., as Rights Agent is incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 4.1 to the Form 8-A.

4.2   

Agreement of Substitution and Amendment of Shareholder Rights Agent Agreement dated as of November 1, 2002 between CIRCOR International, Inc. and American Stock Transfer and Trust Company is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit 4.2 on Form 10-K, File No. 001-14962, filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on March 12, 2003.

9   

Voting Trust Agreements:

9.1   

The Amended and Restated George B. Horne Voting Trust Agreement-1997 dated as of September 14, 1999 is incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 9.1 to Amendment No. 1 to the Form 10, filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on September 22, 1999 (“Amendment No. 1 to the Form 10”).

10   

Material Contracts:

10.1   

CIRCOR International, Inc. 1999 Stock Option and Incentive Plan is incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.1 on Form 10, filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on September 22, 1999 (“Amendment No. 1 to the Form 10”).

10.2   

Form of Incentive Stock Option Agreement under the 1999 Stock Option and Incentive Plan is incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.2 to Amendment No. 1 to the Form 10.

10.3   

Form of Non-Qualified Stock Option Agreement for Employees under the 1999 Stock Option and Incentive Plan (Five Year Graduated Vesting Schedule) is incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.3 to Amendment No. 1 to the Form 10.

10.4   

Form of Non-Qualified Stock Option Agreement for Employees under the 1999 Stock Option and Incentive Plan (Performance Accelerated Vesting Schedule) is incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.4 on Form 10-12B/A, File No. 000 – 26961, filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on September 22, 1999 (“Amendment No. 1 to the Form 10”).

10.5   

Form of Non-Qualified Stock Option Agreement for Independent Directors under the 1999 Stock Option and Incentive Plan is incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.5 on Form 10-12B/A, File No. 000 – 26961, filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on September 22, 1999 (“Amendment No. 1 to the Form 10”).

10.6   

CIRCOR International, Inc. Management Stock Purchase Plan is incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.6 on Form 10-12B/A, File No. 000 – 26961, filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on September 22, 1999 (“Amendment No. 1 to the Form 10”).

 

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Exhibit

No.


  

Description and Location


10.7   

Form of CIRCOR International, Inc. Supplemental Employee Retirement Plan is incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.7 on Form 10-12B/A, File No. 000 – 26961, filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on September 22, 1999 (“Amendment No. 1 to the Form 10”).

10.8   

Trust Indenture from Village of Walden Industrial Development Agency to The First National Bank of Boston, as Trustee, dated June 1, 1994 is incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.14 on Form 10-K, File No. 000 – 14787, filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on September 26, 1994.

10.9   

Loan Agreement between Hillsborough County Industrial Development Authority and Leslie Controls, Inc. dated July 1, 1994 is incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.15 on Form 10-K, File No. 000 – 14787, filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on September 26, 1994.

10.10   

Trust Indenture from Hillsborough County Industrial Development Authority to The First National Bank of Boston, as Trustee, dated July 1, 1994 is incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.17 on Form 10-K, File No. 000 – 14787, filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on September 26, 1994.

10.11   

Form of Indemnification Agreement between CIRCOR International, Inc. and its Officers and Directors dated November 6, 2002 is incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.12 on Form 10-K, File No. 001 – 14962, filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on March 12, 2003.

10.12   

Executive Employment Agreement, as amended and restated, between CIRCOR, Inc. and David A. Bloss, Sr., dated as of September 16, 2005 is incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.1 on Form 8-K, File No. 001 - 14962, filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on September 20, 2005.

10.13*   

Credit Agreement, dated as of December 20, 2005, by and among CIRCOR International, Inc., as Borrower, the Other Credit Parties party hereto, the Lenders party hereto, as Lenders, Keybank National Association, as an LC issuer, Swing Line lender, and as the Lead Arranger, Sole Bookrunner and administrative agent, and Bank of America NA as Syndication Agent

10.14   

Note Purchase Agreement, dated as of October 19, 1999, among CIRCOR International, Inc., a Delaware corporation, the Subsidiary Guarantors and each of the Purchasers listed on Schedule A attached thereto is incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.20 to CIRCOR International, Inc.’s Current Report on Form 8-K, File No. 001-14962, filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on October 21, 1999.

10.15   

Sharing agreements regarding the rights of debt holders relative to one another in the event of insolvency is incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.21 on From 10 Q/A filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on August 14, 2000.

 

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Exhibit

No.


  

Description and Location


10.16   

. Executive Change of Control Agreement between CIRCOR International, Inc. and Andrew William Higgins dated February 15, 2005 is incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.5 to CIRCOR International, Inc.’s Form 8-K, File No. 001-14962, filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on February 22, 2005.

10.17   

Executive Change of Control Agreement between CIRCOR, Inc. and Kenneth W. Smith dated August 8, 2000 is incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.24 on Form 10-Q, File No. 001-14962, filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on November 14, 2000.

10.18   

Executive Change of Control Agreement between CIRCOR, Inc. and John F. Kober III dated September 16, 2005 is incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.3 on Form 8-K, File No. 001-14962, filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on September 20, 2005.

10.19   

Executive Change of Control Agreement between CIRCOR, Inc. and Alan J. Glass dated August 8, 2000 is incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.26 on Form 10-K, File No. 001-14962, filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on March 7, 2001.

10.20   

Executive Change of Control Agreement between CIRCOR, Inc. and Paul M. Coppinger dated August 1, 2001 is incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.28 on Form 10-K, File No. 001-14962, filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on March 7, 2001.

10.21   

Executive Change of Control Agreement between John W. Cope and CIRCOR, Inc. dated August 5, 2005 is incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.8 on Form 8-K, File No. 001-14962, filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on August 9 2005.

10.22   

First Amendment to Executive Change of Control Agreement between Kenneth W. Smith and CIRCOR, Inc. dated December 7, 2001 is incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.28 on Form 10-K, File No. 001-14962, filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on March 12, 2002.

10.23   

Executive Change of Control Agreement between CIRCOR International, Inc. and Susan M. McCuaig dated May 5, 2005 is incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.41 to CIRCOR International, Inc.’s Form 10-Q, File No. 001-14962, filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on May 6, 2005

10.24   

First Amendment to Executive Change of Control Agreement between Alan J. Glass and CIRCOR, Inc. dated December 7, 2001 is incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.30 on Form 10-K, File No. 001-14962, filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on March 12, 2002.

10.25   

First Amendment to Executive Change of Control Agreement between Paul M. Coppinger and CIRCOR, Inc. dated December 7, 2001 is incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.31 on Form 10-K, File No. 001-14962, filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on March 12, 2002.

10.26   

Executive Change of Control Agreement between Carl J. Nasca and CIRCOR, Inc. dated December 7, 2001 is incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.33 on Form 10-K, File No. 001-14962, filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on March 12, 2002.

 

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Table of Contents

Exhibit

No.


  

Description and Location


10.27   

Executive Change of Control Agreement between Barry L. Taylor, Sr. and CIRCOR, Inc. dated December 7, 2001 is incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.34 on Form 10-K, File No. 001-14962, filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on March 12, 2002.

10.28   

Letter of Credit, Reimbursement and Guaranty Agreement dated as of March 3, 2004 among Spence Engineering Company, Inc., as Borrower, CIRCOR International, Inc., as Guarantor, and Sun Trust National Bank as Letter of Credit Provider thereto is incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.32 on Form 10-K, File No. 001-14962, filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on March 15, 2004.

10.29   

Letter of Credit, Reimbursement and Guaranty Agreement dated as of March 3, 2004 among Leslie Controls Inc., as Borrower, CIRCOR International, Inc., as Guarantor, and Sun Trust National Bank as Letter of Credit Provider thereto is incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.31 on Form 10-K, File No. 001-14962, filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on March 15, 2004.

10.30   

First Amendment to CIRCOR International Inc. Amended and Restated 1999 Stock Option and Incentive Plan dated as of December 1, 2005 is incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.1 on Form 8-K, File No. 001-14962, filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on December 7, 2005.

10.31*   

Agreement related to the sale and purchase of the entire issued share capital of Hale Hamilton Holdings Limited dated as of February 6, 2006

21*   

Schedule of Subsidiaries of CIRCOR International, Inc.

23*   

Consent of KPMG LLP, Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm.

31.1*   

Certification of Chief Executive Officer Pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.

31.2*   

Certification of Chief Financial Officer Pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.

32.1*   

Certification of Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer pursuant to 18 U.S.C. Section 1350, as adopted pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.


*   Filed with this report.

 

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Table of Contents

Signatures

 

Pursuant to the requirements of Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the Registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned, thereunto duly authorized.

 

CIRCOR INTERNATIONAL, INC.

By:

 

/s/    DAVID A. BLOSS, SR.        


   

David A. Bloss, Sr.

Chairman, President

and Chief Executive Officer

Date:

  February 27, 2006

 

Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, this report has been signed below by the following persons on behalf of the Registrant and in the capacities and on the dates indicated.

 

Signature


  

Title


 

Date


/s/    DAVID A. BLOSS, SR.        


David A. Bloss, Sr.

  

Chairman, President, Chief Executive

Officer and Director (Principal

Executive Officer)

  February 27, 2006

/s/    KENNETH W. SMITH        


Kenneth W. Smith

   Senior Vice President, Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer (Principal Financial Officer)   February 27, 2006

/s/    JOHN F. KOBER        


John F. Kober

   Vice President, Corporate Controller (Principal Accounting Officer)   February 27, 2006

/s/    JEROME D. BRADY        


Jerome D. Brady

   Director   February 27, 2006

/s/    THOMAS E. CALLAHAN        


Thomas E. Callahan

   Director   February 27, 2006

/s/    DEWAIN K. CROSS        


Dewain K. Cross

   Director   February 27, 2006

/s/    DAVID F. DIETZ        


David F. Dietz

   Director   February 27, 2006

/s/    DOUGLAS M. HAYES        


Douglas M. Hayes

   Director   February 27, 2006

/s/    THOMAS E. NAUGLE        


Thomas E. Naugle

   Director   February 27, 2006

 

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Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm

 

The Board of Directors and Shareholders

CIRCOR International, Inc.:

 

We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheets of CIRCOR International, Inc. as of December 31, 2005 and 2004, and the related consolidated statements of operations, cash flows and shareholders’ equity for each of the years in the three-year period ended December 31, 2005. In connection with our audits of the consolidated financial statements, we also audited the accompanying financial statement schedule of valuation and qualifying accounts. These consolidated financial statements and schedule are the responsibility of the Company’s management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these consolidated financial statements and financial statement schedule based on our audits.

 

We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the consolidated financial statements are free of material misstatement. An audit includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. An audit also includes assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall financial statement presentation. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.

 

In our opinion, the consolidated financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of CIRCOR International, Inc. as of December 31, 2005 and 2004, and the results of their operations and their cash flows for each of the years in the three-year period ended December 31, 2005, in conformity with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles. Also, in our opinion, the related financial statement schedule, when considered in relation to the basic consolidated financial statements taken as a whole, presents fairly, in all material respects, the information set forth therein.

 

We also have audited, in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States), the effectiveness of CIRCOR International, Inc.’s internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2005, based on criteria established in Internal Control – Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (COSO), and our report dated February 27, 2006, expressed an unqualified opinion on management’s assessment of, and the effective operation of, internal control over financial reporting.

 

/s/ KPMG LLP

 

Boston, Massachusetts

February 27, 2006

 

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Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm

 

The Board of Directors and Shareholders

CIRCOR International, Inc.:

 

We have audited management’s assessment, included in the accompanying Management’s Report on Internal Control Over Financial Reporting, that CIRCOR International, Inc. (the “Company”) maintained effective internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2005, based on criteria established in Internal Control – Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (COSO). The Company’s management is responsible for maintaining effective internal control over financial reporting and for its assessment of the effectiveness of internal control over financial reporting. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on management’s assessment and an opinion on the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting based on our audit.

 

We conducted our audit in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether effective internal control over financial reporting was maintained in all material respects. Our audit included obtaining an understanding of internal control over financial reporting, evaluating management’s assessment, testing and evaluating the design and operating effectiveness of internal control, and performing such other procedures as we considered necessary in the circumstances. We believe that our audit provides a reasonable basis for our opinion.

 

A company’s internal control over financial reporting is a process designed to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles. A company’s internal control over financial reporting includes those policies and procedures that (1) pertain to the maintenance of records that, in reasonable detail, accurately and fairly reflect the transactions and dispositions of the assets of the company; (2) provide reasonable assurance that transactions are recorded as necessary to permit preparation of financial statements in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles, and that receipts and expenditures of the company are being made only in accordance with authorizations of management and directors of the company; and (3) provide reasonable assurance regarding prevention or timely detection of unauthorized acquisition, use, or disposition of the company’s assets that could have a material effect on the financial statements.

 

Because of its inherent limitations, internal control over financial reporting may not prevent or detect misstatements. Also, projections of any evaluation of effectiveness to future periods are subject to the risk that controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions, or that the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may deteriorate.

 

In our opinion, management’s assessment that CIRCOR International, Inc. maintained effective internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2005, is fairly stated, in all material respects, based on criteria established in Internal Control – Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (COSO). Also, in our opinion, CIRCOR

 

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International, Inc. maintained, in all material respects, effective internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2005, based on criteria established in Internal Control – Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (COSO).

 

CIRCOR International, Inc. acquired Loud Engineering & Manufacturing, Inc.( “Loud”) and Industria S.A. (“Industria”) during 2005, and management excluded from its assessment of the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2005, Loud’s and Industria’s internal control over financial reporting associated with aggregate total assets of $54,853,000 and aggregate total revenues of $22,781,000 included in the consolidated financial statements of CIRCOR International, Inc. as of and for the year ended December 31, 2005. Our audit of internal control over financial reporting of CIRCOR International, Inc. also excluded an evaluation of the internal control over financial reporting of Loud and Industria.

 

We also have audited, in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States), the consolidated balance sheets of CIRCOR International, Inc. as of December 31, 2005 and 2004, and the related consolidated statements of operations, cash flows and shareholders’ equity for each of the years in the three-year period ended December 31, 2005, and the related financial statement schedule, and our report dated February 27, 2006, expressed an unqualified opinion on those consolidated financial statements and the related financial statement schedule.

 

/s/ KPMG LLP

 

Boston, Massachusetts

February 27, 2006

 

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CIRCOR INTERNATIONAL, INC.

Consolidated Balance Sheets

(In thousands, except share data)

 

     December 31,

     2005

   2004

ASSETS

             

CURRENT ASSETS:

             

Cash and cash equivalents

   $ 31,112    $ 58,653

Investments

     86      4,155

Trade accounts receivable, less allowance for doubtful accounts of $1,943 and $2,549, respectively

     77,731      64,521

Inventories

     107,687      105,150

Prepaid expenses and other current assets

     3,705      2,414

Deferred income taxes

     4,328      6,953

Assets held for sale

     1,115      –  
    

  

Total Current Assets

     225,764      241,846
    

  

PROPERTY, PLANT AND EQUIPMENT, NET

     63,350      59,302

OTHER ASSETS:

             

Goodwill

     140,179      120,307

Intangibles, net

     20,941      1,424

Other assets

     10,146      5,539
    

  

TOTAL ASSETS

   $ 460,380    $ 428,418
    

  

LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY

             

CURRENT LIABILITIES:

             

Accounts payable

   $ 49,736    $ 38,023

Accrued expenses and other current liabilities

     26,031      22,519

Accrued compensation and benefits

     14,509      7,971

Income taxes payable

     3,418      1,362

Notes payable and current portion of long-term debt

     27,213      15,051
    

  

Total Current Liabilities

     120,907      84,926
    

  

LONG-TERM DEBT, NET OF CURRENT PORTION

     6,278      27,829

DEFERRED INCOME TAXES

     11,237      6,932

OTHER NON-CURRENT LIABILITIES

     11,235      10,646

MINORITY INTEREST

     –        4,650

SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY:

             

Preferred stock, $0.01 par value; 1,000,000 shares authorized; no shares issued and outstanding

     –        –  

Common stock, $0.01 par value; 29,000,000 shares authorized; 15,823,529 and 15,430,305 issued and outstanding at December 31, 2005 and 2004, respectively

     158      154

Additional paid-in capital

     215,274      208,392

Retained earnings

     82,318      64,293

Accumulated other comprehensive income

     12,973      20,596
    

  

Total Shareholders’ Equity

     310,723      293,435
    

  

TOTAL LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY

   $ 460,380    $ 428,418
    

  

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 

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CIRCOR INTERNATIONAL, INC.

Consolidated Statements of Operations

(In thousands, except per share data)

 

     Year Ended December 31,

 
     2005

    2004

    2003

 

Net revenues

   $ 450,531     $ 381,834     $ 359,453  

Cost of revenues

     317,856       274,265       253,941  
    


 


 


GROSS PROFIT

     132,675       107,569       105,512  

Selling, general and administrative expenses

     98,040       85,332       74,162  

Special charges

     1,630       303       1,363  
    


 


 


OPERATING INCOME

     33,005       21,934       29,987  
    


 


 


Other (income) expense:

                        

Interest income

     (579 )     (756 )     (775 )

Interest expense

     3,389       4,446       5,926  

Other, net

     144       (234 )     (837 )
    


 


 


TOTAL OTHER EXPENSE

     2,954       3,456       4,314  
    


 


 


INCOME BEFORE INCOME TAXES

     30,051       18,478       25,673  

Provision for income taxes

     9,668       6,675       7,800  
    


 


 


NET INCOME

   $ 20,383     $ 11,803     $ 17,873  
    


 


 


Earnings per common share:

                        

Basic

   $ 1.30     $ 0.77     $ 1.18  

Diluted

   $ 1.27     $ 0.74     $ 1.14  

Weighted average common shares outstanding:

                        

Basic

     15,690       15,361       15,207  

Diluted

     16,019       15,877       15,675  

Dividends paid per common share

   $ 0.15     $ 0.15     $ 0.15  

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 

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CIRCOR INTERNATIONAL, INC.

Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows

(In thousands)

 

     Year Ended December 31,

 
     2005

    2004

    2003

 

OPERATING ACTIVITIES

                        

Net income

   $ 20,383     $ 11,803     $ 17,873  

Adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash provided by operating activities:

                        

Depreciation

     9,825       9,664       9,564  

Amortization

     588       192       298  

Compensation expense of stock-based plans

     1,020       650       530  

Deferred income taxes

     (36 )     (14 )     1,372  

Loss on write-down of property, plant and equipment

     –         –         381  

(Gain) loss on sale/disposal of property, plant and equipment

     128       704       (21 )

Gain on the sale of assets held for sale

     (110 )     (149 )     –    

Gain on the sale of marketable securities

     –         –         (64 )

Changes in operating assets and liabilities, net of effects from business acquisitions:

                        

Trade accounts receivable

     (10,090 )     4,960       (2,586 )

Inventories

     1,638       (1,764 )     19,754  

Prepaid expenses and other assets

     160       3,079       1,788  

Accounts payable, accrued expenses and other liabilities

     21,820       124       9,757  
    


 


 


Net cash provided by operating activities

     45,326       29,249       58,646  
    


 


 


INVESTING ACTIVITIES

                        

Additions to property, plant and equipment

     (15,021 )     (5,287 )     (6,823 )

Proceeds from the disposal of property, plant and equipment

     99       1,009       192  

Proceeds from the sale of assets held for sale

     1,467       4,038       –    

Proceeds from the sale of investments

     6,699       11,339       4,155  

Purchase of investments

     (2,535 )     (7,077 )     (7,857 )

Business acquisitions, net of cash acquired

     (50,779 )     (12,591 )     (9,619 )

Purchase price escrow release payments

     (829 )     (1,538 )     (1,029 )
    


 


 


Net cash used in investing activities

     (60,899 )     (10,107 )     (20,981 )
    


 


 


FINANCING ACTIVITIES

                        

Proceeds from long-term borrowings

     10,669       322       1,593  

Payments of long-term debt

     (22,386 )     (18,787 )     (20,097 )

Dividends paid

     (2,358 )     (2,303 )     (2,280 )

Proceeds from the exercise of stock options

     3,771       1,232       1,267  
    


 


 


Net cash used in financing activities

     (10,304 )     (19,536 )     (19,517 )
    


 


 


Effect of exchange rate changes on cash and cash equivalents

     (1,664 )     845       1,672  
    


 


 


INCREASE (DECREASE) IN CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS

     (27,541 )     451       19,820  

Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of year

     58,653       58,202       38,382  
    


 


 


CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS AT END OF YEAR

   $ 31,112     $ 58,653     $ 58,202  
    


 


 


Supplemental Cash Flow Information:

                        

Cash paid during the year for:

                        

Income taxes

   $ 5,422     $ 8,854     $ 7,683  

Interest

   $ 3,321     $ 4,345     $ 5,747  

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 

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CIRCOR INTERNATIONAL, INC.

Consolidated Statements of Shareholders’ Equity

(In thousands)

 

    Common Stock

 

Additional

Paid-in

Capital


 

Retained

Earnings


   

Accumulated

Other

Comprehensive

Income (Loss)


   

Total

Shareholders’
Equity


 
    Shares

  Amount

       

BALANCE AT DECEMBER 31, 2002

  15,108   $ 151   $ 203,952   $ 39,200     $ 356     $ 243,659  
   
 

 

 


 


 


Net income

                    17,873               17,873  

Cumulative translation adjustment

                            12,719       12,719  

Reversal of minimum pension liability (net of tax expense of $608)

                            996       996  

Reversal of unrealized net gain-investments (net of tax benefit of $10)

                            (17 )     (17 )
                                   


Comprehensive income

                                    31,571  
                                   


Common stock dividends declared

                    (2,280 )             (2,280 )

Stock options exercised

  132     1     1,266                     1,267  

Income tax benefit from stock options

              332                     332  

Conversion of restricted stock units

  62     1     403                     404  

Net change in restricted stock units

              207                     207  
   
 

 

 


 


 


BALANCE AT DECEMBER 31, 2003

  15,302     153     206,160     54,793       14,054       275,160  
   
 

 

 


 


 


Net income

                    11,803               11,803  

Cumulative translation adjustment

                            6,542       6,542  
                                   


Comprehensive income

                                    18,345  
                                   


Common stock dividends declared

                    (2,303 )             (2,303 )

Stock options exercised

  102     1     1,231                     1,232  

Income tax benefit from stock options

              232                     232  

Conversion of restricted stock units

  26     –       209                     209  

Net change in restricted stock units

              560                     560  
   
 

 

 


 


 


BALANCE AT DECEMBER 31, 2004

  15,430     154     208,392     64,293       20,596       293,435  
   
 

 

 


 


 


Net income

                    20,383               20,383  

Cumulative translation adjustment

                            (7,470 )     (7,470 )

Minimum pension liability (net of tax expense of $94)

                            (153 )     (153 )
                                   


Comprehensive income

                                    12,760  
                                   


Common stock dividends declared

                    (2,358 )             (2,358 )

Stock options exercised

  358     4     3,768                     3,772  

Income tax benefit from stock options

              1,947                     1,947  

Conversion of restricted stock units

  36     –       224                     224  

Net change in restricted stock units

              943                     943  
   
 

 

 


 


 


BALANCE AT DECEMBER 31, 2005

  15,824   $ 158   $ 215,274   $ 82,318     $ 12,973     $ 310,723  
   
 

 

 


 


 


 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 

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CIRCOR INTERNATIONAL, INC.

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

 

(1)    Description of Business

 

CIRCOR International, Inc. (“CIRCOR” or the “Company” or “we”) designs, manufactures and distributes valves and related products and services for use in a wide range of applications to optimize the efficiency or ensure the safety of fluid-control systems. The valves and related fluid-control products we manufacture are used in processing industries; oil and gas exploration, production, distribution and refining; pipeline construction and maintenance; HVAC and power; aerospace, military and commercial aircraft; and maritime manufacturing and maintenance. We have used both internal product development and strategic acquisitions to assemble a complete array of fluid-control products and technologies that enables us to address our customers’ unique fluid-control application needs. We have two major product groups: Instrumentation and Thermal Fluid Controls Products, and Energy Products.

 

The Instrumentation and Thermal Fluid Controls Products Group designs, manufactures and sells valves and controls for diverse end-uses including instrumentation, aerospace, cryogenic and steam applications. Selected products include precision valves, compression tube and pipefitting, control valves, relief valves, couplers, regulators and strainers. The Instrumentation and Thermal Fluid Controls Products Group includes the following subsidiaries and major business units: Aerodyne Controls; Circle Seal Controls, Inc.; CPC-Cryolab; Hoke, Inc.; Leslie Controls, Inc.; Nicholson Steam Trap; Rockwood Swendeman; Regeltechnik Kornwestheim GmbH; Société Alsacienne Regulaves Thermiques von Rohr, S.A.; Spence Engineering Company, Inc.; Spence Strainers; Texas Sampling, Inc.; DQS International and subsidiary, Dopak Inc.; Loud Engineering Co.; Tomco Quick Couplers; and U.S. Para Plate Corporation.

 

The Energy Products Group designs, manufactures and sells flanged-end and threaded-end floating and trunnion ball valves, needle valves, check valves, butterfly valves and large forged steel ball valves and gate valves for use in oil, gas and chemical processing and industrial applications. The Energy Products Group includes the following subsidiaries and major divisions: KF Contromatics Specialty Products; KF Industries, Inc.; Pibiviesse S.p.A.; SKVC; CEP Canada; and Mallard Control Company.

 

On October 18, 1999 (the “spin-off date”), we became a publicly owned company as a result of a tax-free distribution of our common stock (the “distribution” or “spin-off”) to the shareholders of our former parent, Watts Water Technologies, Inc., formerly Watts Industries, Inc. (“Watts”).

 

(2)    Summary of Significant Accounting Policies

 

Principles of Consolidation and Basis of Presentation

 

The consolidated financial statements include the accounts of CIRCOR and its wholly and majority owned subsidiaries. The results of companies acquired during the year are included in the consolidated financial statements from the date of acquisition. All significant intercompany balances and transactions have been eliminated in consolidation.

 

Use of Estimates

 

The preparation of these financial statements in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the amounts reported in the

 

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CIRCOR INTERNATIONAL, INC.

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements – (Continued)

 

consolidated financial statements and accompanying disclosures. Some of the more significant estimates relate to purchase accounting, depreciation, amortization and impairment of long-lived assets, pension obligations, deferred income taxes, inventory valuations, special charges, environmental liability, and product liability. While management believes that the estimates and assumptions used in the preparation of the financial statements are appropriate, actual results could differ from those estimates.

 

Revenue Recognition

 

Revenue is recognized when products are delivered, title and risk of loss have passed to the customer, no significant post-delivery obligations remain and collection of the resulting receivable is reasonably assured. Shipping and handling costs invoiced to customers are recorded as components of revenues and the associated costs are recorded as cost of sales.

 

Cash Equivalents

 

Cash equivalents consist of highly liquid investments with original maturities of three months or less.

 

Investments

 

Investments consist of guaranteed investment contracts, all of which are currently designated as available for sale. As such, the carrying values of our investments are marked to market and unrealized gains and losses at the balance sheet date are recognized net of tax in other comprehensive income.

 

Inventories

 

Inventories are valued at the lower of cost or market. Cost is generally determined on the first-in, first-out (“FIFO”) basis. Where appropriate, standard cost systems are utilized for purposes of determining cost; the standards are adjusted as necessary to ensure they approximate actual costs. Estimates of lower of cost or market value of inventory are determined at the operating unit level and evaluated periodically. Estimates for obsolescence or unmarketable inventory are maintained based on current economic conditions, historical sales quantities and patterns and, in some cases, the specific risk of loss on specifically identified inventories. Such inventories are recorded at estimated realizable value net of the costs of disposal.

 

In the fourth quarter 2004, we evaluated the impact of our programs initiated during the past two years to increase the proportion of our inventory purchased from less-expensive suppliers, primarily in Asia and Eastern Europe. One result of our successful foreign-sourcing programs is that we need less internal manufacturing and warehousing capability, particularly in North America. In addition, our past practice has been to retain much of our inventory for extended periods, even utilizing extra warehousing facilities and resources. After considering these factors, we concluded that it was more cost effective to dispose of selected inventory and reduce warehouse capacity than to incur ongoing carrying costs. We decided to lower our costs by disposing of certain inventories and consolidating facilities. As a result of that decision, we recorded a pre-tax charge of $6.6 million in the fourth quarter 2004 to write down our inventories. During 2005, we disposed of approximately $10.9 million of inventory, a majority of which was reserved for as of December 31, 2004.

 

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CIRCOR INTERNATIONAL, INC.

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements – (Continued)

 

Property, Plant and Equipment

 

Property, plant and equipment are recorded at cost. Depreciation is provided on a straight-line basis over the estimated useful lives of the assets, which range from 13 to 40 years for buildings and improvements and 3 to 10 years for manufacturing machinery and equipment and office equipment, and 3 to 5 years for computer equipment and software and motor vehicles. Leasehold improvements are amortized on a straight-line basis over the shorter of the lease term or estimated useful life of the asset. Repairs and maintenance costs are expensed as incurred.

 

Goodwill and Other Intangible Assets

 

We perform an impairment test on an annual basis as of November 1 or more frequently if circumstances warrant. The most recent impairment test was conducted in the fourth quarter of 2005 and resulted in no impairment. Intangible assets that have definitive useful lives continue to be amortized over their useful lives.

 

Impairment of Other Long-Lived Assets

 

Other long-lived assets include property, plant, and equipment and intangibles with definite lives. We perform impairment analyses of our other long-lived assets whenever events and circumstances indicate that they may be impaired. When the undiscounted future cash flows are expected to be less than the carrying value of the assets being reviewed for impairment, the assets are written down to fair market value based upon third party appraisals.

 

Advertising Costs

 

Our accounting policy is to expense advertising costs, principally in selling, general and administrative expenses, when incurred. Our advertising costs for the years ended December 31, 2005, 2004, and 2003 were $1.6 million, $1.4 million, and $1.6 million, respectively.

 

Research and Development

 

Research and development expenditures are expensed when incurred and are included in the selling, general and administrative expense in the Consolidated Statements of Operations. Our research and development expenditures for the years ended December 31, 2005, 2004 and 2003, were $1.9 million, $1.6 million and $2.4 million, respectively.

 

Income Taxes

 

Income taxes are accounted for under the asset and liability method. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are recognized for the future tax consequences attributable to differences between the financial statement carrying amounts of existing assets and liabilities and their respective tax bases and operating loss and tax credit carry-forwards. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are measured using enacted tax rates expected to apply to taxable income in the years in which those temporary differences are expected to be

 

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CIRCOR INTERNATIONAL, INC.

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements – (Continued)

 

recovered or settled. The effect on deferred tax assets and liabilities of a change in tax rates is recognized in income in the period that includes the enactment date. A valuation allowance is recognized if we anticipate that we may not realize some or all of a deferred tax asset.

 

Environmental Compliance and Remediation

 

Environmental expenditures that relate to current operations are expensed or capitalized as appropriate. Expenditures that relate to existing conditions caused by past operations, which do not contribute to current or future revenue generation, are expensed. Liabilities are recorded when environmental assessments and, or, remedial efforts are probable and the costs can be reasonably estimated. Estimated costs are based upon current laws and regulations, existing technology and the most probable method of remediation. The costs are not discounted and exclude the effects of inflation. If the cost estimates result in a range of equally probable amounts, the lower end of the range is accrued.

 

Foreign Currency Translation

 

Our international subsidiaries operate and report their financial results using local functional currencies. Accordingly, all assets and liabilities of these subsidiaries are translated into United States dollars using exchange rates in effect at the end of the relevant periods, and revenues and costs are translated using weighted average exchange rates for the relevant periods. The resulting translation adjustments are presented as a separate component of accumulated other comprehensive income. We do not provide for U.S. income taxes on foreign currency translation adjustments since we do not provide for such taxes on undistributed earnings of foreign subsidiaries. Our net foreign exchange gains and (losses) recorded for the years ended December 31, 2005, 2004 and 2003 were not significant.

 

Earnings Per Common Share

 

Basic earnings per common share are calculated by dividing net income by the number of weighted average common shares outstanding. Diluted earnings per common share is calculated by dividing net income by the weighted average common shares outstanding and assumes the conversion of all dilutive securities.

 

Earnings per common share and the weighted average number of shares used to compute net earnings per common share, basic and assuming full dilution, are reconciled below (In thousands, except per share data):

 

     Year Ended December 31,

     2005

   2004

   2003

     Net
Income


   Shares

  

Per Share

Amount


   Net
Income


   Shares

  

Per Share

Amount


  

Net

Income


   Shares

  

Per Share

Amount


Basic EPS

   $ 20,383    15,690    $ 1.30    $ 11,803    15,361    $ 0.77    $ 17,873    15,207    $ 1.18

Dilutive securities, principally Common stock options

     –      329      0.03      –      516      0.03      –      468      0.04
    

  
  

  

  
  

  

  
  

Diluted EPS

   $ 20,383    16,019    $ 1.27    $ 11,803    15,877    $ 0.74    $ 17,873    15,675    $ 1.14
    

  
  

  

  
  

  

  
  

 

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CIRCOR INTERNATIONAL, INC.

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements – (Continued)

 

Certain stock options to purchase common shares were not included in the table above because they were anti-dilutive. The options excluded from the table for the years ended December 31, 2005, 2004 and 2003 were: 21,100 options ranging from $26.29 to $27.81, 148,100 options at $23.80, and 5,000 options at $19.75, respectively.

 

Stock Based Compensation

 

We measure compensation cost in accordance with Accounting Principles Board Opinion No. 25, “Accounting for Stock Issued to Employees,” (“APB No. 25”) and related interpretations. Accordingly, no accounting recognition is given to stock options granted to our employees at fair market value until the options are exercised. Upon exercise, we credit the net proceeds, including income tax benefits realized, if any, to equity. The following table illustrates the effect on net income and earnings per share if we had applied the fair value recognition provisions of FASB Statement No. 123, “Accounting for Stock Based Compensation,” to stock based employee compensation (In thousands, except per share data):

 

     Year Ended December 31,

     2005

   2004

   2003

Net income

   $ 20,383    $ 11,803    $ 17,873

Add stock-based compensation expense included in reported net income, net of tax

     690      423      339

Less stock-based employee compensation cost, that would have been included in the determination of net income under a fair value based method, net of tax

     1,678      1,305      1,184
    

  

  

Pro forma net income as if the fair value based method had been applied to all awards

   $ 19,395    $ 10,921    $ 17,028
    

  

  

Earnings per common share (as reported):

                    

Basic

   $ 1.30    $ 0.77    $ 1.18

Diluted

   $ 1.27    $ 0.74    $ 1.14

Pro forma earnings per common share:

                    

Basic

   $ 1.24    $ 0.71    $ 1.12

Diluted

   $ 1.21    $ 0.69    $ 1.09

 

The fair value of the options grants were estimated as of the date of the grants using the Black-Scholes option-pricing model with the following assumptions for each of the respective years:

 

     December 31,

     2005

   2004

   2003

Risk-free interest rate

   3.8%    3.8%    4.0%

Expected life (years)

   6.4    7    7

Expected stock volatility

   40.7%    32.8%    44.1%

Expected dividend yield

   0.6%    0.9%    1.1%

 

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CIRCOR INTERNATIONAL, INC.

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements – (Continued)

 

Derivative Financial Instruments

 

We use foreign currency forward exchange contracts to manage currency exchange exposures in certain foreign currency denominated transactions. Gains and losses on contracts designated as hedges are recognized when hedged transactions affect earnings, which is generally in the same time period as the underlying foreign currency denominated transactions. Gains and losses on contracts that do not qualify for hedge accounting treatment are recognized as incurred as a component of other non-operating income or expense and were not significant for the years ended December 31, 2005, 2004 and 2003.

 

New Accounting Standards

 

In December 2004, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) issued FASB Statement No. 123 (R) “Shared Base Payment: an amendment of FASB Statements No. 123 and 95”. FASB Statement 123R requires companies to recognize in the income statement the grant-date fair value of stock options and other equity-based compensation issued to employees, but expresses no preference for a type of valuation model. The Statement is effective for CIRCOR’s interim and annual periods beginning after December 31, 2005. We are going to utilize the modified prospective method. Our expectation for 2006 is that corporate general and administrative expenses will include an incremental $1.3 million pretax expense for stock option compensation under FAS123R, which we are adopting January 1, 2006. See Note 11 to the consolidated financial statements for further information.

 

In December 2004, the FASB issued Statement No. 153, “Exchanges of Nonmonetary Assets”, which is effective for fiscal years beginning after June 15, 2005. FASB Statement No. 153 amends APB 29, Accounting for Nonmonetary Transactions. FASB Statement No. 153 is based on the principle that exchanges of nonmonetary assets should be measured based on the fair value of the assets exchanged. The guidance in APB 29 included certain exceptions to that principle. FASB Statement No. 153 amends APB 29 to eliminate the exception for nonmonetary exchanges of similar productive assets and replaces it with a general exception for exchanges of nonmonetary assets that do not have commercial substance. A nonmonetary exchange has commercial substance if the future cash flows of the entity are expected to change significantly as a result of the exchange. The adoption of this statement did not impact our financial position or results of operations.

 

In November 2004, the FASB issued Statement No. 151, “Inventory Costs, to amend the guidance in Chapter 4”. FASB Statement No.151 clarifies the accounting for abnormal amounts of idle facility expense, freight, handling costs, and wasted material. The Statement requires that those items be recognized as current-period charges. Additionally, FASB Statement No. 151 requires that allocation of fixed production overheads to the costs of conversion be based on the normal capacity of the production facilities. The Statement is effective for inventory costs incurred during fiscal years beginning after June 15, 2005. The adoption of this standard is not expected to impact our financial position or results of operations.

 

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CIRCOR INTERNATIONAL, INC.

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements – (Continued)

 

Reclassifications

 

Certain prior period financial statement amounts have been reclassified to conform to currently reported presentations.

 

(3)    Business Acquisitions

 

Our growth strategy includes strategic acquisitions that complement and extend our current offering of engineered flow control products. Our acquisitions have well established brand recognition and are well known within the industry. We have historically financed our acquisitions from available cash balances and we accounted for these transactions as purchase business combinations.

 

On November 14, 2003, we acquired DQS International B.V. (“DQS”), headquartered in Rotterdam, the Netherlands, for $6.0 million in cash and the assumption of $0.8 million of net debt. We also deposited an additional $0.6 million into a separate escrow account for the benefit of the sellers, subject to any such claims by us as are allowed in accordance with the purchase agreement. During July 2004 and May 2005, we increased the recorded goodwill by $0.3 million upon the release to the former selling shareholders of funds previously held in escrow. The $4.5 million excess of the purchase price over the fair value of the net identifiable assets is recorded as goodwill.

 

On December 11, 2003, we acquired Texas Sampling, Inc. (“TSI”), located in Victoria, Texas for $4.4 million in cash. We also deposited an additional $0.2 million into a separate escrow account for the benefit of the sellers, subject to any such claims by us as are allowed in accordance with the purchase agreement. During September 2005, we increased the recorded goodwill by $0.2 million upon the release to the former shareholders of funds previously held in escrow. The $4.0 million excess of the original purchase price over the fair value of net identifiable assets is recorded as goodwill and is expected to be deductible for tax purposes. Any funds remaining in the escrow account at the conclusion of the contingency period will be distributed to the sellers and accounted for as additional purchase price.

 

On April 30, 2004, we acquired Mallard Control Company (“Mallard”), located in Beaumont, Texas, for $9.7 million in cash plus the assumption of $4.3 million of debt, that we paid off at closing. During April 2005, we increased the recorded goodwill by $0.3 million upon the release to the former shareholders of funds previously held in escrow. As of December 31, 2005, we maintained approximately $1.0 million of cash in a separate escrow account for the benefit of the sellers, subject to any such indemnification claims by us as are allowed in accordance with the acquisition agreements. Any funds remaining in the escrow account at the conclusion of the contingency period will be distributed to the sellers and accounted for as additional purchase price. Mallard produces control valves, relief valves, pressure regulators and other related products, primarily for oil and gas production and processing and other petrochemical applications that are sold under the Mallard and Hydroseal brand names. Mallard is being operated within our Energy Products segment. During the second quarter of 2005, we finalized identifiable asset amounts associated with our April 2004 acquisition of Mallard. In connection with the finalization of our Mallard acquisition amounts, we recorded $3.4 million of intangible assets, associated with customer relationships, brand names, and non-competition agreements. Approximately $2.2 million

 

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CIRCOR INTERNATIONAL, INC.

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements – (Continued)

 

of these intangible assets will be amortized over 10-15 year periods and will result in annual amortization expense of approximately $0.2 million. The remaining $1.2 million of intangible assets will not be amortized but will be subject to impairment tests. The $3.4 million excess of the purchase price over the fair value of the net identifiable assets was recorded as goodwill.

 

On January 14, 2005, we acquired Loud Engineering & Manufacturing, Inc. (“Loud”) located in Ontario, California for approximately $34.7 million, net of acquired cash of $1.3 million and including $5.4 million placed in an escrow account for the benefit of the sellers, subject to any such indemnification claims by us as are allowed in accordance with the acquisition agreement. This $5.4 million escrow is included in Other Assets on our consolidated balance sheet. Loud is a leading designer and manufacturer of landing gear systems and related components for military helicopters and jets and is operated within our Instrumentation and Thermal Fluid Controls Products segment. During the fourth quarter of 2005, we finalized our purchase price allocation. In connection with the finalization of Loud’s purchase price, we recorded $7.0 million of current assets, $1.9 million of fixed assets, $0.7 million of other assets, $16.0 million of intangible assets, $15.2 million of goodwill, $3.1 million of current liabilities, and $7.3 million of other liabilities. Included in the $16.0 million of intangible assets are customer relationships, brand names, a license agreement and non-competition agreements. Approximately $10.5 million of these intangible assets will be amortized over 10-20 year periods and will result in annual amortization expense of approximately $0.7 million. The remaining $5.5 million of intangible assets will not be amortized but will be subject to impairment tests. The $15.2 million excess of the original purchase price over the fair value of the net identifiable assets was recorded as goodwill and will not be deductible for tax purposes.

 

In May 2005 we acquired the 40% interest that we did not own in our Chinese joint venture, Suzhou KF Valve Co., (“SKVC”) located in Suzhou, China, for $6.8 million. SKVC will continue to be operated in our Energy Products segment and primarily manufactures ball valves for other entities within our Energy Products segment. Based on preliminary purchase price allocations, the excess of the purchase price over the fair value of the net identifiable assets was recorded as $1.9 million of goodwill and an increase to an existing intangible of $0.3 million. Purchase accounting will be finalized by the end of the second quarter of 2006 and may result in the identification of intangible assets that may be amortized and expensed over future periods and also may impact the amount currently recorded as identifiable assets and goodwill and will not be deductible for tax purposes.

 

On October 3, 2005, we acquired Industria S.A. (“Industria”) located in Paris, France, for approximately $10.2 million in cash. Industria produces solenoid valves and components for commercial and military aerospace applications and will operate as part of our Aerospace Products business unit with our Instrumentation and Thermal Fluid Controls product segment. The $5.9 million excess of the original purchase price over the fair value of the net identifiable assets was recorded as goodwill and will not be deductible for tax purposes. Purchase accounting will be finalized by the end of the second quarter of 2006 and may result in the identification of other intangible assets that may be amortized and expensed over future periods.

 

See Note 21 to the consolidated financial statements for information concerning subsequent acquisitions.

 

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CIRCOR INTERNATIONAL, INC.

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements – (Continued)

 

The following table reflects unaudited pro forma consolidated results on the basis that Loud, Industria, Mallard, TSI, and DQS acquisitions took place and were recorded at the beginning of each of the respective periods presented (Unaudited, in thousands, except per share data):

 

     Year Ended December 31,

     2005

   2004

   2003

Net revenue

   $ 464,063    $ 417,413    $ 406,614

Net income

   $ 20,553    $ 14,413    $ 20,760

Earnings per share: basic

   $ 1.31    $ 0.95    $ 1.37

Earnings per share: diluted

   $ 1.28    $ 0.92    $ 1.32

 

The unaudited pro forma consolidated results of operations may not be indicative of the actual results that would have occurred had the acquisitions been consummated at the beginning of each period, or of future operations of the consolidated companies under our ownership and management.

 

The following tables provide reconciliations of the net cash paid and goodwill recorded for acquisitions during the years ended December 31, 2005, 2004 and 2003 (In thousands):

 

     Year Ended December 31,

     2005

   2004

   2003

Reconciliation of net cash paid:

                    

Fair value of assets acquired

   $ 61,851    $ 14,707    $ 13,530

Purchase price escrow release payments

     829      1,538      1,029

Acquisition escrow payments

     5,400      –        –  

Less: liabilities assumed

     12,887      2,116      3,141

Less: accrued purchase price

     985      –        –  
    

  

  

Cash paid

     54,208      14,129      11,418

Less: cash acquired

     2,600      –        770
    

  

  

Net cash paid for acquired businesses

   $ 51,608    $ 14,129    $ 10,648
    

  

  

Determination of goodwill:

                    

Cash paid, net of cash acquired

   $ 51,608    $ 14,129    $ 10,648

Accrued purchase price

     985      –        –  

Liabilities assumed

     12,887      2,116      3,141

Less: fair value of tangible assets acquired, net of cash acquired

     36,194      8,404      5,335
    

  

  

Goodwill

   $ 29,286    $ 7,841    $ 8,454
    

  

  

 

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CIRCOR INTERNATIONAL, INC.

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements – (Continued)

 

(4)    Investments

 

All investments are designated as available for sale. Investments as of December 31, 2005 and investments at December 31, 2004 and 2004 are as follows (In thousands):

 

    

Adjusted

Cost


  

Gross

Unrealized

Gains


  

Gross

Unrealized

Losses


  

Estimated

Fair

Value


December 31, 2005:

                           

Guaranteed investment contracts maturing in various periods to December 2006 at rate of 2.5%

   $ 86    $ –      $ –      $ 86
    

  

  

  

December 31, 2004:

                           

Guaranteed investment contracts maturing in various periods to December 2005 at rate of 2.25%

   $ 4,155    $ –      $ –      $ 4,155
    

  

  

  

 

(5)    Inventories

 

Inventories consist of the following (In thousands):

 

     December 31,

     2005

   2004

Raw materials

   $ 36,774    $ 43,130

Work in process

     40,352      33,221

Finished goods

     30,561      28,799
    

  

     $ 107,687    $ 105,150
    

  

 

(6)    Property, Plant and Equipment

 

Property, plant and equipment consists of the following (In thousands):

 

     December 31,

 
     2005

    2004

 

Land

   $ 6,560     $ 6,546  

Buildings and improvements

     36,730       34,315  

Manufacturing machinery and equipment

     100,181       96,376  

Computer equipment and software

     12,891       11,842  

Office equipment and motor vehicles

     9,397       8,704  

Construction in progress

     827       1,087  
    


 


       166,587       158,870  

Accumulated depreciation

     (103,236 )     (99,568 )
    


 


     $ 63,350     $ 59,302  
    


 


 

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CIRCOR INTERNATIONAL, INC.

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements – (Continued)

 

(7)    Goodwill and Other Intangible Assets

 

We completed our annual goodwill impairment valuation as of November 1, 2005 during the fourth quarter of 2005, and determined that the fair value of the reporting units’ goodwill exceeded their carrying value and that no impairment existed for the annual evaluation as well.

 

The following table shows goodwill, by segment, net of accumulated amortization, as of December 31, 2004 and December 31, 2005 (In thousands):

 

   

Instrumentation
& Thermal Fluid

Controls

Products


   

Energy

Products


   

Consolidated

Total


 

Goodwill as of December 31, 2004

  $ 101,291     $ 19,016     $ 120,307  

Business acquisitions (see Note 3)

    21,247       1,866       23,113  

Purchase price adjustment of previous acquisitions (see Note 3)

    533       296       829  

Adjustments to preliminary purchase price allocation

    –         (2,459 )     (2,459 )

Currency translation adjustments

    (1,763 )     152       (1,611 )
   


 


 


Goodwill as of December 31, 2005

  $ 121,308     $ 18,871     $ 140,179  
   


 


 


 

The table below presents gross intangible assets and the related accumulated amortization as of December 31, 2005 (In thousands):

 

    

Gross

Carrying

Amount


  

Accumulated

Amortization


 

Patents

   $ 5,140    $ (5,060 )

Trademarks and trade names

     510      (155 )

Land use rights

     1,846      (365 )

Customer relationships

     11,559      (345 )

Brand names

     6,662      –    

Other

     1,299      (150 )
    

  


Total

   $ 27,016    $ (6,075 )
    

  


Net carrying value of intangible assets

   $ 20,941         
    

        

 

The table below presents estimated amortization expense for intangible assets recorded as of December 31, 2005 (In thousands):

 

     2006

   2007

   2008

   2009

   2010

  

After

2010


Estimated amortization expense

   $ 961    $ 907    $ 907    $ 907    $ 900    $ 9,614
    

  

  

  

  

  

 

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CIRCOR INTERNATIONAL, INC.

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements – (Continued)

 

(8)    Income Taxes

 

The significant components of our deferred income tax liabilities and assets are as follows (In thousands):

 

     December 31,

 
     2005

    2004

 

Deferred income tax liabilities:

                

Excess tax over book depreciation

   $ 6,510     $ 7,165  

Inventory

     1,538       2,050  

Goodwill & other intangibles

     11,045       3,033  

Other

     156       870  
    


 


Total deferred income tax liabilities

     19,249       13,118  
    


 


Deferred income tax assets:

                

Accrued expenses

     7,409       5,522  

Inventory

     3,491       5,676  

Net operating loss and credit carry-forward

     11,754       1,692  

Cost basis differences in intangible assets

     279       575  

Other

     478       624  
    


 


Total deferred income tax assets

     23,411       14,089  

Valuation allowance

     11,071       950  
    


 


Deferred income tax asset, net of valuation allowance

     12,340       13,139  
    


 


Deferred income tax ( liability) asset, net

   $ (6,909 )   $ 21  
    


 


The above components of deferred income taxes are classified in the consolidated balance sheets as follows: (In thousands)

                

Net current deferred income tax asset

   $ 4,328     $ 6,953  

Net non-current deferred income tax liability

     (11,237 )     (6,932 )
    


 


Deferred income tax (liability) asset, net

   $ (6,909 )   $ 21  
    


 


 

The provision for income taxes is based on the following pre-tax income (In thousands):

 

     Year Ended December 31,

     2005

   2004

   2003

Domestic

   $ 13,548    $ 4,015    $ 13,401

Foreign

     16,503      14,463      12,272
    

  

  

     $ 30,051    $ 18,478    $ 25,673
    

  

  

 

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CIRCOR INTERNATIONAL, INC.

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements – (Continued)

 

The provision for income taxes (benefit) consists of the following (In thousands):

 

     Year Ended December 31,

     2005

    2004

    2003

Current tax expense:

                      

Federal

   $ 3,294     $ 579     $ 2,188

Foreign

     5,815       5,654       4,044

State

     594       456       196
    


 


 

       9,703       6,689       6,428
    


 


 

Deferred tax expense (benefit):

                      

Federal

     183       348       953

Foreign

     (248 )     (169 )     284

State

     30       (193 )     135
    


 


 

       (35 )     (14 )     1,372
    


 


 

     $ 9,668     $ 6,675     $ 7,800
    


 


 

 

Actual income taxes reported from operations are different from those that would have been computed by applying the federal statutory tax rate to income before income taxes. The reasons for these differences are as follows:

 

     Year Ended December 31,

 
     2005

     2004

     2003

 

Computed expected federal income tax rate

   35.0 %    35.0 %    35.0 %

State income taxes, net of federal tax benefit

   1.3      0.9      0.8  

Foreign tax rate differential and credits

   (1.8 )    5.5      (0.1 )

Extraterritorial income exclusion (formerly FSC)

   (1.8 )    (3.0 )    (2.9 )

Research and experimental credit

   (0.8 )    (1.0 )    (2.2 )

Other, net

   0.3      (1.3 )    (0.2 )
    

  

  

Effective Tax Rate

   32.2 %    36.1 %    30.4 %
    

  

  

 

At December 31, 2005, we had foreign net operating loss carry forwards of $0.3 million. The loss can be carried forward indefinitely. We also had foreign tax credits of $10.6 million, state net operating losses of $1.6 million and state tax credits of $1.1 million. The foreign tax credits if not utilized will expire in 2010 through 2015. The state net operating losses and state tax credits if not utilized will expire in 2014 through 2023. We had a valuation allowance of $11.1 million and $0.9 million as of December 31, 2005 and 2004, respectively, against the foreign tax credits, state operating losses, and state tax credits. We believe that after considering all of the available objective evidence, it is more likely than not that the results of future operations will generate sufficient taxable income to realize the remaining deferred tax assets.

 

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CIRCOR INTERNATIONAL, INC.

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements – (Continued)

 

Undistributed earnings of our foreign subsidiaries amounted to $26.3 million at December 31, 2005 and $30.1 million at December 31, 2004. Upon distribution of any those earnings, in the form of dividends or otherwise, we will be subject to both U.S. income taxes (subject to an adjustment for foreign tax credits) and withholding taxes payable to the various foreign countries. Determination of the amount of U.S. income tax liability that would be incurred is not practicable because of the complexities associated with its hypothetical calculation; however, unrecognized foreign tax credits would be available to reduce some portion of any U.S. income tax liability. Withholding taxes of $1.2 million would be payable upon remittance of all previously unremitted earnings at December 31, 2005.

 

Undistributed earnings are considered to be indefinitely reinvested and, accordingly, no provision for U.S. federal and state income taxes has been recorded thereon.

 

(9)    Accrued Expenses and Other Current Liabilities

 

Accrued expenses and other current liabilities consist of the following (In thousands):

 

     December 31,

     2005

   2004

Customer deposits and obligations

   $ 7,226    $ 7,558

Commissions and sales incentives payable

     4,734      4,513

Professional fees

     2,742      2,085

Insurance

     1,134      2,064

Acquisition purchase price accrual

     985      –  

Accrued construction costs

     948      –  

Accrued special charges (See Note 19)

     616      90

Other

     7,646      6,209
    

  

     $ 26,031    $ 22,519
    

  

 

(10)    Financing Arrangements

 

Long-term debt consists of the following (In thousands):

 

     December 31,

     2005

   2004

Senior unsecured notes, annual principal payments of $15.0 million through October 19, 2006, at a fixed interest rate of 8.23%

   $ 15,000    $ 30,000

Industrial revenue bonds, maturing in December 2006 and August 2019, at variable interest rates of 3.60% and 3.65% at December 31, 2005, and 1.00% and 2.10% at December 31, 2004

     12,260      12,260

Capital lease obligations

     1,732      75

Other borrowings, at varying interest rates ranging from 3.67% to 6.25% in 2005 and 5.0% to 6.25% in 2004

     4,499      545
    

  

Total long-term debt

     33,491      42,880

Less: current portion

     27,213      15,051
    

  

Total long-term debt, less current portion

   $ 6,278    $ 27,829
    

  

 

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CIRCOR INTERNATIONAL, INC.

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements – (Continued)

 

On December 20, 2005, we entered into a Credit Agreement by and among the Company, as Borrower; certain domestic subsidiaries of the Company, as Subsidiary Guarantors. The Credit Agreement provides for a $95 million revolving line of credit and letter of credit facility and replaced our old $75 million facility. In accordance with the Credit Agreement, the rate of interest and facility fees we are charged vary based upon changes in our net debt leverage ratio. We can borrow at either the Euro dollar rate plus an applicable margin of 0.625% to 1.625% or at a base rate plus an applicable margin of 0% to 0.25%. The base rate for any day is the higher of the Fed Funds rate plus 0.50% or the lender’s Prime Rate. We are also required to pay an unused facility fee that can range from 0.15% to 0.35% per annum and a utilization fee of 0.125% per annum if our borrowings exceed 50% of the credit facility limit. The facility expires on the earlier of December 20, 2010 or the date on which the revolving line of credit commitments are terminated by the lenders in accordance with the Credit Agreement.

 

At December 31, 2005 and 2004, we had $95 million and $75 million, respectively available from our senior unsecured revolving credit facilities to support our acquisition program, working capital requirements, and for general corporate purposes.

 

On October 19, 1999, we issued $75.0 million of unsecured notes that mature through annual principal payments from October 2002 – 2006. Proceeds from the notes and borrowings under the credit facility were used to repay $96.0 million of investments by, and advances from, Watts and the outstanding balance under a then existing term loan agreement. Beginning on October 19, 2002, we commenced making $15.0 million annual payments reducing the $75.0 million outstanding balance of our unsecured 8.23% senior notes, which mature in October 2006.

 

Certain of our loan agreements contain covenants that require, among other items, maintenance of certain financial ratios and also limit our ability to: enter into secured and unsecured borrowing arrangements; issue dividends to shareholders; acquire and dispose of businesses; transfer assets among domestic and international entities and issue additional shares of our stock. We were in compliance with all covenants related to our existing debt obligations at December 31, 2005 and 2004. We expect to be in compliance with all covenants related to our debt obligations through 2006.

 

At December 31, 2005, minimum principal payments required during each of the next five years are as follows (In thousands):

 

     2006

   2007

   2008

   2009

   2010

   After 2010

Minimum principal payments

   $ 27,213    $ 400    $ 290    $ 386    $ 100    $ 5,102
    

  

  

  

  

  

 

(11)    Stock-Based Compensation

 

The 1999 Stock Option and Incentive Plan (the “1999 Stock Plan”) adopted by our Board of Directors permits the grant of the following types of awards to our officers, other employees and non-employee directors: incentive stock options, non-qualified stock options, deferred stock awards, restricted stock awards, unrestricted stock awards, performance share awards, stock appreciation rights (“SARs”) and dividend equivalent rights. The 1999 Stock Plan provides for the issuance of up to 3,000,000 new shares

 

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CIRCOR INTERNATIONAL, INC.

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements – (Continued)

 

of common stock (subject to adjustment for stock splits and similar events). New options granted under the 1999 Stock Plan could have varying vesting provisions and exercise periods. Options granted vest in periods ranging from 1 to 6 years and expire 10 years after the grant date.

 

During 2004, we began granting restricted stock units in lieu of a portion of employee stock option awards. We account for these RSUs by expensing the fair value at the date of issue of each RSU to selling, general and administrative expenses ratably over the three-year or five-year vesting periods. 76,100 and 40,100 RSUs with approximate fair values of $25.00 and $24.00 were granted during the years ended December 31, 2005, and 2004, respectively.

 

The CIRCOR Management Stock Purchase Plan, which is a component of the 1999 Stock Plan, provides that eligible employees may elect to receive restricted stock units in lieu of all or a portion of their pre-tax annual incentive bonus and, in some cases, make after-tax contributions in exchange for restricted stock units. In addition, non-employee directors may elect to receive restricted stock units in lieu of all or a portion of their annual directors’ fees. Each restricted stock unit represents a right to receive one share of our common stock after a three-year vesting period. Restricted stock units are granted at a discount of 33% from the fair market value of the shares of common stock on the date of grant. This discount is amortized as compensation expense, to selling, general and administrative expenses, ratably over the three-year vesting period. 26,510, 52,948, and 20,130 restricted stock units with per unit fair values of $8.22, $7.84 and $4.95 were granted during the years ended December 31, 2005, 2004, and 2003, respectively.

 

At the spin-off date, vested and non-vested Watts options held by our employees terminated in accordance with their terms and new options of equivalent value were issued under the 1999 Stock Plan to replace the Watts options (“replacement options”). The vesting dates and exercise periods of these options were not affected by the replacement. Based on their original Watts grant date, the CIRCOR replacement options vested during the years 1999 to 2003 and expire 10 years after grant of the original Watts options. Additionally, at the spin-off date, vested and non-vested Watts restricted stock units and SARs held by our employees were converted into comparable restricted stock units and SARs based on our common stock. Vested restricted stock units will be distributed in shares of our common stock. Upon exercise, vested SARs will be payable in cash. At December 31, 2005, there were 256,072 restricted stock units and 9,600 SARs outstanding. Compensation expense related to restricted stock units and SARs for the years ended December 31, 2005, 2004, and 2003 was $1.0 million, $0.7 million, and $0.5 million, respectively.

 

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CIRCOR INTERNATIONAL, INC.

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements – (Continued)

 

A summary of the status of all options granted to employees and non-employee directors at December 31, 2005, 2004, and 2003 and changes during the years then ended is presented in the table below (Options in thousands):

 

     December 31,

     2005

   2004

   2003

     Options

   

Weighted

Average

Exercise Price


   Options

   

Weighted

Average

Exercise Price


   Options

   

Weighted

Average

Exercise Price


Options outstanding at beginning of period

   1,273     $ 13.28    1,335     $ 12.24    1,498     $ 12.02

Granted

   188       24.90    118       23.74    15       15.42

Exercised

   (358 )     10.55    (102 )     12.06    (132 )     9.59

Canceled

   (23 )     20.21    (78 )     12.96    (46 )     13.69
    

        

        

     

Options outstanding at end of period

   1,080     $ 16.07    1,273     $ 13.28    1,335     $ 12.24
    

        

        

     

Options exercisable at end of period

   654     $ 12.94    819     $ 11.65    738     $ 11.51

Weighted average fair value of options granted

         $ 10.92          $ 8.98          $ 7.18

 

The following table summarizes information about stock options outstanding at December 31, 2005:

 

     Options Outstanding

   Options Exercisable

Range of Exercise Prices


  

Options

(thousands)


  

Weighted Average

Remaining

Contractual Life
(Years)


  

Weighted Average

Exercise Price


  

Options

(thousands)


  

Weighted Average

Exercise Price


$  7.17 – $ 9.55

   79    3.7    $ 8.36    79    $ 8.36

    9.56 – 11.95

   155    3.8      10.38    155      10.38

  11.96 – 14.34

   391    5.4      13.64    290      13.55

  14.35 – 16.73

   169    5.8      16.32    111      16.32

  19.12 – 21.51

   3    7.6      19.75    –        –  

  21.52 – 23.90

   108    8.1      23.77    19      23.80

  23.91 – 26.29

   175    9.2      24.94    –        –  
    
              
      

$  7.17 – $26.29

   1,080    6.0    $ 16.07    654    $ 12.94
    
              
      

 

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CIRCOR INTERNATIONAL, INC.

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements – (Continued)

 

(12)    Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income

 

The accumulated other comprehensive income as December 31, 2005 consists of the following (In thousands):

 

     December 31, 2005

 
    

Gross

Item


   

Tax

Effect


  

Net

of Tax


 

Cumulative translation adjustment

   $ 13,126     $ –      $ 13,126  

Additional minimum pension liability

     (247 )     94      (153 )
    


 

  


Total accumulated comprehensive income (loss)

   $ 12,879     $ 94    $ 12,973  
    


 

  


 

Accumulated other comprehensive income at December 31, 2004 consisted of only accumulated translation adjustments of and $20.6 million.

 

(13)    Employee Benefit Plans

 

We maintain two pension benefit plans, a qualified noncontributory defined benefit plan that covers substantially all of our salaried and hourly non-union employees in the United States, and a nonqualified, noncontributory defined benefit supplemental plan that provides benefits to certain highly compensated officers and employees. To date, the supplemental plan remains an unfunded plan. These plans include significant pension benefit obligations which are calculated based on actuarial valuations. Key assumptions are made in determining these obligations and related expenses, including expected rates of return on plan assets and discount rates. Benefits are based primarily on years of service and employees’ compensation. The annual measurement date for both of our plans is September 30th.

 

During 2005, we made $2.0 million in cash contributions to our qualified defined benefit pension plan. In 2006, we are not expecting to make voluntary cash contributions to our qualified defined benefit pension plan, although global capital market and interest rate fluctuations may impact future funding requirements.

 

Additionally, substantially all of our U.S. employees are eligible to participate in a 401(k) savings plan. Under this plan, we match a specified percentage of employee contributions, subject to certain limitations.

 

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CIRCOR INTERNATIONAL, INC.

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements – (Continued)

 

The components of net benefit expense are as follows (In thousands):

 

     Year Ended December 31,

 
     2005

    2004

    2003

 

Components of net benefit expense:

                        

Service cost-benefits earned

   $ 2,159     $ 2,322     $ 1,822  

Interest cost on benefits obligation

     1,453       1,315       983  

Net loss amortization

     199       286       265  

Transition asset amortization

     (8 )     (8 )     (32 )

Prior service cost amortization

     98       98       98  

Expected return on assets

     (1,854 )     (1,541 )     (968 )
    


 


 


Net periodic cost of defined benefits plans

     2,047       2,472       2,168  

Cost of 401(k) plan company match contributions

     339       326       282  
    


 


 


Net benefit plans expense

   $ 2,386     $ 2,798     $ 2,450  
    


 


 


 

The weighted average assumptions used in determining the net periodic benefit cost and benefit obligations and net benefit cost for the pension plans are shown below:

 

     Year Ended December 31,

     2005

   2004

   2003

Net periodic benefit cost:

              

Discount rate

   5.80%    6.00%    6.75%

Expected return on plan assets

   8.50%    8.75%    8.75%

Rate of compensation increase

   4.00%    4.00%    4.00%

Benefit obligations:

              

Discount rate

   5.50%    5.80%    6.00%

Rate of compensation increase

   4.00%    4.00%    4.00%

 

In selecting the expected long-term rate of return on assets, we considered the average rate of earnings expected on the funds invested or to be invested to provide for the benefits of these plans. This included considering the trusts’ asset allocation and the expected returns likely to be earned over the life of the plans. Discount rates are selected based upon rates of return at the measurement date utilizing benchmark pension discount rates currently available and expected to be available during the period to maturity of the pension benefits.

 

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CIRCOR INTERNATIONAL, INC.

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements – (Continued)

 

The funded status of the defined benefit plan and amounts recognized in the balance sheet are as follows (In thousands):

 

     December 31,

 
     2005

    2004

 

Change in projected benefit obligation:

                

Balance at beginning of year

   $ 25,269     $ 22,093  

Service cost

     2,159       2,322  

Interest cost

     1,453       1,315  

Actuarial loss

     3,779       99  

Benefits paid

     (436 )     (390 )

Administrative expenses

     (340 )     (170 )
    


 


Balance at end of year

   $ 31,884     $ 25,269  
    


 


Change in fair value of plan assets:

                

Balance at beginning of year

   $ 21,358     $ 17,424  

Actual return on assets

     2,931       2,194  

Benefits paid

     (436 )     (390 )

Administrative expenses

     (340 )     (170 )

Employer contributions

     2,000       2,300  
    


 


Fair value of plan assets at end of year

   $ 25,513     $ 21,358  
    


 


Funded status:

                

Excess of projected benefit obligation over the fair value of plan assets

   $ (6,371 )   $ (3,912 )

Unrecognized transition asset

     (22 )     (31 )

Unrecognized prior service cost

     563       661  

Unrecognized actuarial loss

     6,970       4,469  
    


 


Net prepaid benefit cost

   $ 1,140     $ 1,187  
    


 


Funded pension plan accumulated benefit obligation (“ABO”)

   $ 24,891     $ 20,676  

Unfunded pension plan ABO

     1,806       1,248  
    


 


Aggregate ABO

   $ 26,697     $ 21,924  
    


 


Plan assets for funded pension plan

   $ 25,513     $ 21,358  

 

At December 31, 2005, the benefit payments expected to be paid in each of the next five years and the aggregate for the five fiscal years thereafter are as follows (In thousands):

 

     2006

   2007

   2008

   2009

   2010

   2011–2015

Expected benefit payments

   $ 527    $ 613    $ 700    $ 819    $ 990    $ 8,396
    

  

  

  

  

  

 

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CIRCOR INTERNATIONAL, INC.

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements – (Continued)

 

The plan assets were held in the following accounts at year-end, expressed as a percent of total assets:

 

     2005

   2004

Equity securities

   70%    70%

Debt securities

   30%    30%
    
  
     100%    100%
    
  
           

 

Our investment objectives for the portfolio of the Plan assets are to match, as closely as possible, the return of a composite benchmark comprised of: 40% of the Russell 1000 Index; 15% of the Russell 1000 Index; 15% of the Morgan Stanley Capital International EAFE Index; and 30% of the Lehman Brothers Aggregate Bond Index. We also seek to maintain a level of volatility (measured as standard deviation of returns) which approximates that of the composite benchmark returns. Rebalancing among asset classes will occur on an annual basis to ensure that the targeted asset allocations are maintained.

 

During the year ended December 31, 2005, a $0.3 million adjustment was made to record the minimum pension liability required to the extent the accumulated benefit obligations exceeded plan assets as of September 30, 2005, the plan measurement date. In conjunction with the adjustment to the liability account, a $0.1 million intangible asset was recorded up to the amount of unrecognized prior service cost for those plans. A $0.2 million corresponding charge, net of tax, was recorded to other accumulated comprehensive income.

 

(14)    Contingencies, Environmental Remediation and Guarantees

 

We, like other worldwide manufacturing companies, are subject to a variety of potential liabilities connected with our business operations, including potential liabilities and expenses associated with possible product defects or failures and compliance with environmental laws. We maintain liability insurance coverage which we believe to be consistent with industry practices. Nonetheless, such insurance coverage may not be adequate to protect us fully against substantial damage claims, which may arise from product defects and failures or from environmental liability.

 

We, like many other manufacturers of fluid control products, have been named as defendants in a growing number of product liability actions brought on behalf of individuals who seek compensation for their alleged exposure to airborne asbestos fibers. In particular, our subsidiaries, Leslie, Spence, and Hoke, collectively have been named as defendants or third-party defendants in asbestos related claims brought on behalf of approximately 22,000 plaintiffs typically against anywhere from 50 to 400 defendants. In some instances, we also have been named individually and/or as successor in interest to one or more of these subsidiaries. These cases have been brought in state courts in Alabama, California, Connecticut, Georgia, Illinois, Louisiana, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Mississippi, Montana, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Texas, Utah, Virginia, Washington and Wyoming with the vast majority of claimants having brought their claims in Mississippi. The cases brought on behalf of the vast majority of claimants seek unspecified

 

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compensatory and punitive damages against all defendants in the aggregate. However, the complaints filed on behalf of claimants who do seek specified compensatory and punitive damages typically seek millions or tens of millions of dollars in damages against the aggregate of defendants.

 

Of the approximately 22,000 plaintiffs who have brought claims against our subsidiaries, all but approximately 600 have been in Mississippi. Recently in Mississippi, the courts have rendered decisions and the legislature has passed legislation aimed at curbing certain abusive practices by plaintiff attorneys pursuant to which large numbers of unrelated plaintiffs (sometimes numbering in the thousands in a single case) would be grouped in the same case against hundreds of defendants. As a result of the recent changes, many of these “mass filings” (including some cases in which CIRCOR companies have been named defendant) have been or are expected to be dismissed. While it is possible that certain dismissed claims would be refiled in Mississippi or in other jurisdictions, any such refilings likely would be made on behalf of one or a small number of related individuals who can demonstrate actual injury and some connection to our subsidiaries’ products.

 

Any components containing asbestos formerly used in Leslie, Spence and Hoke products were entirely internal to the product and, we believe, would not give rise to ambient asbestos dust during normal operation or during normal inspection and repair procedures. Moreover, to date, our insurers have been paying the vast majority of the costs associated with the defense of these actions, particular with respect to Spence and Hoke for which insurance has paid all defense costs to date. As we previously have disclosed, we negotiated a revised cost sharing understanding with Leslie’s insurers which results in Leslie being responsible for 29% of its defense costs. In light of the foregoing, we currently believe that we have no basis on which to conclude that these cases may have a material adverse effect on our financial condition, results of operations or cash flows. However, due to the nature and number of variables associated with asbestos related claims, such as the rate at which new claims may be filed; the availability of insurance policies to continue to recover certain of our costs relating to the defense and payment of these claims; the impact of bankruptcies of other companies currently or historically defending asbestos claims including our co-defendants; the uncertainties surrounding the litigation process from jurisdiction to jurisdiction and from case to case; the impact of potential changes in legislative or judicial standards; the type and severity of the disease alleged to be suffered by each claimant; and increases in the expense of medical treatment, we are unable to reliably estimate the ultimate costs to us of these claims.

 

We have reviewed all of our pending judicial and legal proceedings, reasonably anticipated costs and expenses in connection with such proceedings, and availability and limits of our insurance coverage, and we have established reserves that we believe are appropriate in light of those outcomes that we believe are probable and estimable at this time.

 

Standby Letters of Credit

 

We execute stand-by letters of credit, which include bid bonds and performance bonds, in the normal course of business to ensure our performance or payments to third parties. The aggregate notional value of these instruments was $12.0 million at December 31, 2005. Our historical experience with these types of instruments has been good and no claims have been paid in the current or past four fiscal years. We

 

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believe that the likelihood of demand for payments relating to the outstanding instruments is remote. These instruments have expiration dates ranging from less than one month to four years from December 31, 2005.

 

The following table contains information related to standby letters of credit instruments outstanding as of December 31, 2005 (In thousands):

 

Term Remaining


  

Maximum Potential

Future Payments


0–12 months

   $ 6,522

Greater than 12 months

     5,431
    

Total

   $ 11,953
    

 

(15)    Guarantees and Indemnification obligations

 

As permitted under Delaware law, we have agreements whereby we indemnify certain of our officers and directors for certain events or occurrences while the officer or director is, or was, serving at our request in such capacity. The term of the indemnification period is for the officer’s or director’s lifetime. The maximum potential amount of future payments we could be required to make under these indemnification agreements is unlimited. However, we have directors and officers liability insurance policies that limit our exposure for events covered under the policies and should enable us to recover a portion of any future amounts paid. As a result of the coverage under these insurance policies, we believe the estimated fair value of these indemnification agreements is minimal and, therefore, have no liabilities recorded from those agreements as of December 31, 2005.

 

In connection with our industrial revenue bond financing arrangements which benefit certain of our subsidiaries, we are obligated to indemnify the banks in connection with certain errors in the administration of these financing arrangements to the extent such errors are not willful and do not constitute gross negligence. This indemnification obligation is unlimited as to time and amount. We have never been required to make any payments pursuant to this indemnification. As a result, we believe the estimated fair value of this indemnification agreement is minimal. Accordingly, we have no liabilities recorded for those agreements as of December 31, 2005.

 

We record provisions for the estimated cost of product warranties, primarily from historical information, at the time product revenue is recognized. While we engage in extensive product quality programs and processes, our warranty obligation is affected by product failure rates, utilization levels, material usage, service delivery costs incurred in correcting a product failure, and supplier warranties on parts delivered to us. Should actual product failure rates, utilization levels, material usage, service delivery costs or supplier warranties on parts differ from our estimates, revisions to the estimated warranty liability would be required.

 

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The following table sets forth information related to our product warranty reserves for the twelve months ended and as of December 31, 2005 (In thousands):

 

Balance at December 31, 2004

   $ 1,864  

Provisions

     1,044  

Claims settled

     (972 )

Acquired liability

     371  

Currency translation adjustments

     (134 )
    


Balance at December 31, 2005

   $ 2,173  
    


 

(16)    Financial Instruments

 

Fair Value

 

The carrying amounts of cash and cash equivalents, trade receivables and trade payables approximate fair value because of the short maturity of these financial instruments. Investments are marked to market at the balance sheet date. The fair value of the senior unsecured notes, based on the value of comparable instruments brought to market, is approximately $15.4 million as of December 31, 2005. The fair value of our variable rate debt approximates its carrying value.

 

In the normal course of our business, we manage risk associated with foreign exchange rates through a variety of strategies, including the use of hedging transactions, executed in accordance with our policies. As a matter of policy, we ordinarily do not use derivative instruments unless there is an underlying exposure. Any change in the value of our derivative instruments would be substantially offset by an opposite change in the underlying hedged items. We do not use derivative instruments for speculative trading purposes.

 

Accounting Policies

 

Using qualifying criteria defined in Statement No. 133, derivative instruments are designated and accounted for as either a hedge of a recognized asset or liability (fair value hedge) or a hedge of a forecasted transaction (cash flow hedge). For a fair value hedge, both the effective and ineffective portions of the change in fair value of the derivative instrument, along with an adjustment to the carrying amount of the hedged item for fair value changes attributable to the hedged risk, are recognized in earnings. For a cash flow hedge, changes in the fair value of the derivative instrument that are highly effective are deferred in accumulated other comprehensive income or loss until the underlying hedged item is recognized in earnings. If the effective portion of fair value or cash flow hedges were to cease to qualify for hedge accounting, or to be terminated, it would continue to be carried on the balance sheet at fair value until settled; however, hedge accounting would be discontinued prospectively. If forecasted transactions were no longer probable of occurring within the specified time period or within an additional 2 month period thereafter, amounts previously deferred in accumulated other comprehensive income or loss would be recognized immediately in earnings.

 

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